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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im saving up for my Gp100 in 4 inch for an all around gun, but i plan on doing some deer hunting with it next year.
Im just curious if i should even bother with a scope, red dot, or just leave it alone. My range wouldnt extend past 75 yards for the shot.
If a scope is recommended, would it be a bad deal if the scope hangs over the muzzle ?
If anyone has any pics of their setup 4 inch setup and experience, please advice.
Any input would be appreciated. Thank you !
 

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If it were me, I would mount a small holographic red dot sight like a Burris Fastfire lll, or a Leupold Delta. Much less bulky than a scope or tube type sight, light weight and durable, and plenty for most hunting situations you are going to use a 4 inch .357 for. I have several Burris Fastfires mounted on handguns, and they work well. Holo sights don't change the balance of the gun nearly as much as a scope, and you can modify some holsters to work a lot easier than you can a scoped gun. You can mount a scope that extends past the muzzle, but the blast can be hard on the tubes finish, and not good for the front glass element if it is near the muzzle.

Larry
 

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I just use the issue irons on mine out to 100yds on my revolvers, including a 4" Security Six and a 4.2" GP100, but do have to admit that I have a scope on a 10" .357 TC. The scope allows for more precise placement, but we're talking 5-6" groups with the 4" revolvers vs 2-3" groups with the 10" TC with a 4x scope. So the group sizes for both are equally serviceable out to 100yds on deer or hogs, but the irons are easier and faster for me from most field positions like kneeling or sitting, while the scope requires a steadier rest because it shows the imperfections in your hold more and it looks like you're shaking through it. Either way, you and I will always have a little shake, even if it is just the shake caused by our hearts beating, but the scope shows it to me and slows me down slightly. Now past 100 yards, the scope wins, but I try to keep my hunting shots inside of 50 yards even though I practice out past 100.
 

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If your still saving up I doubt that you will be able to shoot well enough to take a deer with it no matter what you use for sights. It is far harder to hold tight groups with handguns than with long gun. For an easy to remember rule of thumb, you effective range on deer is the longest range you can keep all shots on a paper plate, and I don`t mean most of them. My longest shot with iron sights on a deer was bat 135 yards, but at that time I was shoot 200 to 400 rounds per week min. and there were some weeks I shoot up to 800 rounds in a week. I also shot a 44 mag. which has far more killing power than a 357. You will find you are doing a lot of tracking with good hits. Just don`t over shoot your range and you should take a lot of deer with your new GP. Personally though, if it`s mainly for deer hunting I would get at least a 6 in. barrel, but if it`s mainly for CCw you on track with the 4 in.
 

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Bigeasy said:
If it were me, I would mount a small holographic red dot sight like a Burris Fastfire lll, or a Leupold Delta. Much less bulky than a scope or tube type sight, light weight and durable, and plenty for most hunting situations you are going to use a 4 inch .357 for. I have several Burris Fastfires mounted on handguns, and they work well. Holo sights don't change the balance of the gun nearly as much as a scope, and you can modify some holsters to work a lot easier than you can a scoped gun. You can mount a scope that extends past the muzzle, but the blast can be hard on the tubes finish, and not good for the front glass element if it is near the muzzle.

Larry
+1
I would look at getting taller sights so you can see the sights as well. It is easy to line up the red dot on the range but sometimes in the field I have had a few problems trying to find the dot when I have it set too low as the day goes on and the woods get brighter. I have only used a red dot on a 22 pistol for shooting squirrels.
The Burris or Eotech will allow you to use standard holsters.
 

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jmho i'd try the iron sights first if you're
able to get a good sight picture and i'd do
plenty of practice. with a 4" barrel i'd
hold up for a sure close in shot unless
you've seen you can consistently hit
at a farther range. i have several 4"
barreled handguns, but they're not
scoped as they are holster guns for
utility. i have some longer barreled
handguns that are scoped that are
better suited for longer ranges and are
used for hunting only.
good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey thanx for all of the replied everyone, I do appreciate it!
I had a "stuff to buy" list going for the Gp100 purchase (holster, Rig, rail and optics) You've talked me into scratching the rail and optics off of the list, which is good, less to save for lol
good to hear the irons are sufficient enough.

pretty sure im gonna miss this hunting season on the purchase.. that should give me plenty of practice with irons :)
 

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Not to be a jerk, but unless you have plenty of handgun experience already, I would skip using it as your main weapon for this season even if you were to go get it tomorrow morning. So this may actually be a blessing in disguise. Now if you get it in time, I would still practice as much as possible between now and the start of season, but would use whatever it is you have been shooting for this season, and maybe carry the GP100 in case you get a shot inside of say 25 yards. You know, a chance to use it, but also limiting yourself to an easy shot this season, and by next season, I am sure you will be able to leave the rifle or whatever you've been using at home. This way, should anything go wrong, or you just have even a slight doubt, you have no pressure to take a shot you shouldn't be taking with the handgun, but can still bring home meat with your rifle that you are more familiar with. This way gives you plenty of time to build up your skill and confidence for next season.

And as has been said, if this is purely for hunting, the 6" version does make it easier to place your shots well. The 4" can do it, but takes more practice and any slight mistake you make shows up more on the target, or maybe I should say off the target.
 

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Hello zrus:
I have 2 rugers 4 5/8 inch bbls. with scopes. One is a 41 mag. the other is a 357 mag.
If I could have them in original condition again I would be pleased.
They both shoot OK but a longer bbl. would be much better.
I also have a TC with 14 in. bbl. and I like it very much.
JMHO
HM
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Lonegun1894 said:
Not to be a jerk, but unless you have plenty of handgun experience already, I would skip using it as your main weapon for this season even if you were to go get it tomorrow morning. So this may actually be a blessing in disguise.

Your ok,
Ive been shooting every week for the past 3 years and on and off before that, hand guns and rifles. Im fairly confident with a wide variety of pistols inside 30 yards.
This doesnt make me a crack shot but, i feel confident to take the step toward the handgun hunt.
My main problem is living in IL. I can only hunt with a shotgun or revolver and single shot pistol.
I want to keep this a 4 inch because i plan to carry here and there, it will be an all purpose firearm.
And hey thanx for posting the pics! now im rich with envy haha
 

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Glad that didn't come across wrong. If you've been practicing to 30 yds, then that should be an easy range for you, and I bet you can double it quick too. For what it's worth, I try to practice to double the range I intend to hunt to, but these guns are capable of more than most people give then credit for. And also, personally, I think you can't do much better than a 4" .357 Mag for an all around gun, so I like the way you think. :)
 

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I think you do not need to buy everything at once.
I often buy the Pistol.
Then buy ammo. Lots of ammo. Start with some 38's and then some mag and have a buddy load the cylinder with some mags, some specials and a few empty mag cases, The empty cases will let you see the
Cleaning supplies you need (357 Brush or Bore snake)
Start shooting the gun.
Then buy the other stuff.
The only way to get good with a handgun is to actually shoot that handgun.
Then buy the holster, or any optics or accessories.
 

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Big fan of the 4" double action 357. Not a big fan of a scope on such a perfect holster gun. For me, I'd probably limit range to about 50 yards.

If your thinkin you need a scope, I'd go with a 7 1/2" Blackhawk in 41 Mag, maybe on a sling. That'd get you in the 100 yard range pretty handily and would give you a purpose built long range hunting revolver.
 

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I would encourage the op consider the GP-100 6" model if he has hunting in mind, not only for the added muzzle velocity of the longer barrel but also for the longer sighting radius should he want to use the iron sights. I have this model and absolutely love the gun. Sub 1 inch groups at 25 yards benchrested with my 180 grain XTP hunting handload. I did upgrade the front sight to a Hi- Viz fiber optic tho.
 

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Masterblaster1 said:
I would encourage the op consider the GP-100 6" model if he has hunting in mind, not only for the added muzzle velocity of the longer barrel but also for the longer sighting radius should he want to use the iron sights. I have this model and absolutely love the gun. Sub 1 inch groups at 25 yards benchrested with my 180 grain XTP hunting handload. I did upgrade the front sight to a Hi- Viz fiber optic tho.
Yeah, a 6" aint too bad for carryin around in the woods in a holster. But not great for a console or glove box in a truck. Or for a night stand gun either. Definitely not as easy to conceal, or retrieve from a concealed spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Masterblaster1 said:
I would encourage the op consider the GP-100 6" model if he has hunting in mind, not only for the added muzzle velocity of the longer barrel but also for the longer sighting radius should he want to use the iron sights. I have this model and absolutely love the gun. Sub 1 inch groups at 25 yards benchrested with my 180 grain XTP hunting handload. I did upgrade the front sight to a Hi- Viz fiber optic tho.

Thats gonna be my later purchase, a dedicated 6inch hunting revolver.
 

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i use either my 7 1/2 SBH for a hunt, or one of
the super 14 barrels on the t/c since i'm not
carrying any other things other than strictly for
hunting. working on fence or riding the tractor
it's a 4" .357 or a 1911. i have a nice holster
for my fence tool belt for my s&w 681 that looks
real stylish (in the woods where nobody can see
it- maybe the NSA with one of their satellites :D )
when i'm trying to work, the larger guns get in my
way more or less, and weigh me down. hunting,
they don't figure in because i don't have on a heavy
belt with fence pliers and a leather pouch full of
staples and another full of wire clips, or trying to
twist around in a tractor seat checking a mower
or looking down at the tires, etc.
 

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I agree with everyone suggesting longer barrels for the longer sight radius and scopes and such, but the OP did say that he wants something for concealed carry that can double for hunting duty, so there's some definite compromises he has to make in his selection. I assume this won't be his only gun, so it's more a choice of what to get first, but as someone who carries everyday, if he's anything like me, he will carry everyday, but probably won't be lucky enough to get to hunt everyday.
 
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