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Discussion Starter #1
I have noticed when I shoot my Ultra, or my brothers, off Bi-Pods my shots are usually high.
I suppose because of the Bi-Pods being so far out on the end of the forearm, it puts pressure there driving my shots high.
I haven't had a chance to try and put them on paper yet but I plan too to see exactly where my shots are going.
-If I am going to shoot primarily off Bi-Pods, should I put a shim or something the like to off set the pressure on the front of the forearm?
-Is there anyway to mount the Bi-Pods closer,or better yet under the forearm screw?
 

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I've toyed with the idea of mounting a swivel stud closer to the spacer, it would have to be done with care to avoid splitting the forend since it's so close to the end grain of the wood on a wood forend. My field alternative has been to shoot over a Stoney Point Explorer Polecat bipod, it can be placed where you need it and isn't attached to the rifle, can be used sitting or standing, so is much more versatile than an attached bipod. The Explorer weighs just 16oz, I made a deer skin sling so I can just throw it over my shoulder when not using it in the field.

Tim

http://www.stoneypoint.com/bipod_index.html
 

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Click on the link below my name!!! :-D :-D :-D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I remember Mac talking about someone that shimed behind the forearm lug to kind of level out the pressure on it. Any ideas Quick?
 

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Stoney Point products

My field alternative has been to shoot over a Stoney Point Explorer Polecat bipod, it can be placed where you need it and isn't attached to the rifle, can be used sitting or standing, so is much more versatile than an attached bipod.
I couldn't agree more. I use a Stoney Point expedition monopod for night time hunting. I stand when hunting at night and I use a scope light. You can really pivot the light around and get some serious scanning coverage with the Monopod.

For daytime shooting, I use a stoney point bipod. You don't get as much swing as you would with the monopod but it is still far more swing than what you would get with a fixed bipod. I belive it gives you a more stable support than collapsible shooting sticks also. And like what was said, you can place the bipod where you want on the forearm, giving you alot more options.

The monopod makes a good walking stick while going to and coming from your stands, and the bipod collapses down for fairly easy storage.

I will say this though. For those wanting somehting like this, don't settle for the cheap stuff. I have had friends get other brand monpods and bipods and they just are not up to the challenge for those that work their equipment hard. Everyone I know that has gone the alternative route has eventually gotten a Stoney Point product. Here is the link and midwayusa.com has soem great deals on their products:

http://www.stoneypoint.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #8
They have some very nice products, but I still like the convience and compact of attachable Bi-Pods.
 

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I have several Harris bipods, low and high, some with the swivel feature.....seldom use them any more, though..... :wink:

Tim
 

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The whole concept to shimming behind the forearm spacer is to stiffen up the whole forearm.If it's loose and wobbeling...you won't get consistant accuracy out of it...putting bi-pods on it only exagerates the problems of inconsistancy.A one piece stock usually will be more accurate than a 2 piece one...notice I say usually...because I certainly will never complain about my 30-06Ultra-comp's accuracy...and by the way...with that barrel on it...it is tight to open...not loose at all...I have to help it fully open...and on every gun I own now I have it that way.For me...it works...and I've had real good luck with my rifles... It would be even better to have it fully bedded as well...it will take all the play out of the fore end...cause when you attach the bi-pod..it has a tendacy to want to jump...the m,ore movement you have...the more jump you will get.

Mac
 

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myarmor said:
I remember Mac talking about someone that shimed behind the forearm lug to kind of level out the pressure on it. Any ideas Quick?
I agree with what Mac says with my limited experimenting so far. Having a loose fitting forend is not good, having one that is firm to put on seems to be the better choice and having the action open with a bit of resistance has shown to be better for consistent accuracy than one that opens loosely. My experiments have been placing a piece of aluminum furnace tape that's cut to the shape of the spacer and placing it between the spacer and forend, then installing the spacer and screws. Once it's there, it can't be seen if you do a good job of trimming it to the shape of the spacer. With the backing on the tape, it measures .006", without .004". It doesn't take much to firm up the action and this seems to work well, so far.

Tim
 

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Bipod react more than rest. You must avoid any strain on the stock, no push laterally or vertically to aim the target from a natural but slightly off target sight line. Otherwise the rifle will move while the shot break, a good follow through will tell you what happen. Handy are good but for a "benchrest" rifle had a long lock time.

I've just replace my bipod by a shooting rest as i just practice at the range.







This is a choate forearm, the piece where the bipod is fixed could be reversed front/rear with 2" of benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thats what I was talking about. I like the Choate stock. Might have to look into buying one soon down the road. As for my forearm, it wasn't loose by any means but I did shim behind it anyway to make it stiffer. I would rather it be a little stiff to open than just pop up.
 

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I've got a prone/bench bipod on mine and as far as i know there is no stock to barrel touching ahead of the stud and where the bipod attaches. I had sanded in front of the stud to float it and my rifle likes it so far (haven't fired with bipod with this sanding, so we'll see how mine goes eh.

pascalp that stock dosen't look like the Survivior nor Ultra Fluted so where did ya get it?
 

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Shooting Handi's off Bi-Pods-suggestions?
Yeah. Shoot off of crossed shooting sticks. Much more versatile than a bipod. In my opinion, more stable too.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Pascalp-I have to ask, why a 30-30 for this project?
Albeit the baddest 30-30 I have ever seen. Nice job man. :twisted:
 

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A bipod is the only way my 223 Ultra will shoot 1/2" groups,I put a bussines card in front of the forend mounting lug to float the forend,and a bag under the buttstock for a really steady mount. I works on my other rifles also. Digger
 

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lostsniper308,
the barrel is stock, the finish is electroless. The black ring is a thread protector, i use a suppressor.

At the range, my handy, now look like:



myarmor,
in fact, i have taken what i have found. I'm not near an handy's nest, far away !.
I have no regrets, 30 is a good caliber and 30-30 is maybe the best 30 for a caster/reloader. Collet length is just what needed to protect grease grove. With a 180gr base is near flush with collet and head is near from grooves.
 
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