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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Guys,


I am thinking of shortening a 22 inch rifle barrel to 21 inches. Problem is, I have never been able to saw anything close to a perpendicular line with a hacksaw. For some reason, the cut always bends right or left as I cut down.


On the other hand, I am pretty good with my 4 inch grinder tool, which takes a cut-off wheel. It is pretty easy to guide as it cuts down into metal.


Any problems using a cut-off wheel to shorten the barrel?


What about the heat generated by the cut off wheel as it cuts? Too much for the metal? Should someone be squirting WD-40 on it the whole time to keep it cool?


Thanks for all advice.


Mannyrock
 

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You can always dress it with a file to clean it up, even using a fixture will result in a off square muzzle if the barrel is tapered, only cutting on a lathe would create a perfect initial cut. I've used a Sawzall a couple times, works better than a hack saw, just be sure to protect the finish from the foot with tape. Thought about the cutoff wheel, but thought it would make it too easy to bugger it real quick. See the H&R FAQs for several home options for cutting and finishing.

Tim
 

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quickdtoo said:
You can always dress it with a file to clean it up, even using a fixture will result in a off square muzzle if the barrel is tapered, only cutting on a lathe would create a perfect initial cut. I've used a Sawzall a couple times, works better than a hack saw, just be sure to protect the finish from the foot with tape. Thought about the cutoff wheel, but thought it would make it too easy to bugger it real quick. See the H&R FAQs for several home options for cutting and finishing.

Tim
There are band saws for cutting pipe square and chop saws with the built in vice just level the barrel before cutting.
 

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I make up wooden blocks and use them as a guide then true the barrel by hand with a file.

Bore a hole in a block of wood. You want a block saw 4-6" square and about as thick. Bore a hole just about but not more then the diameter of your barrel. Then cut in half bisecting the hole you just drilled.

Clamp this around the barrel in a vice and using the wood as a guide going slowly cut off your barrel... easy and much straighter.

CW
 

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I wouldn't worry about how its cut off but do keep the abrasive grit out of the bore. A paper plug a few inches down the bore will work just fine. I use a hacksaw and that's plenty fast.. The crown must be squared after shortening. I used a set of tools from Brownells that pilots from the bore. works great.
 

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Good info. I have a Remington adl that I need to do the same with maybe an 1.5" on it. Not sure about the OP but mine is due to crown/barrel damage from a previous owner. I thought it would be a cheap way to make it usable until I can decided what to do with it.

Bruce
 

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Absolutely!! People think it's much more mystical than it is! Thousandths off the muzzle can make a difference!!

IINM we used to have a barrel facer for loan. Maybe Tim can comment. This had a pilot then belt things centered and cutter to square and chamfer the muzzle to a protective degree. (Doesn't require it at all. The x degree of the crown is only to better protect the delicate exit of the rifling. )
Or brownells has them for you to buy b

CW
 

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I am no gunsmith but have chopped a bull barrel with a guided hacksaw and refaced it with the loaner from Tim. It was an hour or so to get it mirror smooth because I'm fussy and did the finish with emery paper to remove the light chatter marks. I cut off a Lone Wolf 10mm ported barrel with a cut off wheel on a Foredom tool ( Dremel on steroids) and it took about 10 mins and required a lot less finish work. Both are outstanding shooters now. You can always re cut and start over if you are not happy. I will always use the cut off from now on and remember to plug the barrel with something to keep it clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As to the question of why I would trim a 22 inch barrel to 21 inches:


I hunt in the mixed woods and fields of the western portion of Virginia. The woods are always dense hardwoods, often with underbrush. The fields are typically small (30 acres or less). So, the hunting can be in either really thick stuff or a totally open field. Shots can be anywhere from 10 yards to 125 yards, all in one day. From a quick look down a timber road, to a high stand on the edge of a field.


I prefer bolt actions, and I have found that a 20 inch barrel is too short for holding steady for long shots, but that a 22 inch barrel is too long for working through the thick stuff. Trimming the barrel to 21 inches seems to make the rifle perfect.


People who hold my rifle say, "Wow, this feels really handy. What model is this?. It comes up fast, but points really well." (It handles like a 94 Winchester carbine but shoots like a full sized bolt gun.)


I tell them that the model doesn't matter, its just the 21 inch barrel.


Of course, I am only 5 ft 8 inches, so this may not be an issue for a taller person with longer arms, but it works for me.


I have always had gunsmiths trim the barrel before, but where I live now, the only gunsmith who is close will not do it unless he pulls the entire barrel, and uses a lathe, and trues the action, and all of the rest, for $150. My rifle shoots great, and I don't want that barrel pulled.


Thanks for all of the replies.


Mannyrock
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes Charles, but the very light Model 7 barrel makes it somewhat butt heavy. The muzzle "wanders" when I try to take a long shot. Cutting down a standard weight barrel by 1 inch still leaves enough weight up front for the gun to point well, but short enough to be handy.
 

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mannyrock said:
. . I have always had gunsmiths trim the barrel before, but where I live now, the only gunsmith who is close will not do it unless he pulls the entire barrel, and uses a lathe, and trues the action, and all of the rest, for $150. . .

what a shame :(
i'd have to find someone who would do what i'd asked for and paid for
if it wasn't dangerous, and make a day of the drive just to spite the . . .uh. . ."gentleman" :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
On top of that, he has a hyper-finicky personality, and is a County Deputy Sheriff.


He said that if he did not pull the barrel and do all of that work, then he could not cut the barrel perfectly, and it might affect accuracy.


I told him that I don't care. 1.5" MOA or so is fine with me. But, he refused.




Mannyrock
 

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Mannyrock, this is going to sound stupid but here goes. get a tubing cutter and use it to make a complete circle back as far as you want it to be cut back. This will give you a reference line and just cut off what's in front of it. Then using files and various grits of silicon carbide paper bring it up to that line. Don't laugh as I have a 1895 chilean mauser bubba got to and that is what he used to cut the barrel down. All you are doing is creating a line so that you have something to reference your cut on. If you have access to a machinist's angle which looks like a large "L" you can use this after the barrel has been cut to insure it's the same all the way on all sides. Frank
 

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Remember the barrel is tapered and the tubing cutter will likely walk a bit but likely not much.. I use a cheap dial calipher to marker the new barrel terminus..
 
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