Graybeard Outdoors banner

21 - 40 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Hunting location does play a part in it too I guess. When I was younger and hunted exclusively on often crowded public land, I took the first shot available. I actually had a doe snatched one year after I put one through the ribs. I found where she had wandered near the road and lay down, the drag marks towards the forestry road, and had heard the truck take off while I was following the blood trail. Some people are just total a**holes.

Thankfully, I have a small place of my own now and access to far less hunted places also. There is a large section of conservation land near me that is about half timber and half set aside for wetlands. The wetlands section is mostly dry during deer season and very few people deer hunt it. Better for me because that is where the deer are during the early season. I just have to hunt from the ground or in very low stands, sometimes only 7 feet off the ground but I can see over the surrounding grass. My youngest shot his first buck sitting in a small, lone cottonwood surrounded by grass and cane. His was 6-7 feet off the ground but that was all he needed to pop the little 5 point through the lungs. He ran about 60 yards before he expired.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
I like the shoulder shot and have taken a couple of deer with the Texas Long Shot right up the booty.
The vernacular for that shot is better known as the "Texas Heart Shot".
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,982 Posts
I have taken neck and head shots, but the shot I have always stressed to my kids was the lung shot. I have read lots of reasons on this thread but to me a lung shot gets the most blood out of the muscle (meat) as the heart keeps pumping blood to the damaged/blown up lungs. On the farm when I was a kid when we killed animals and immediately slit the throat so the heart pumped out the blood. This stands out in my head as the best quality meat- so if you can get the chest cavity full of blood as the animal expires. Of course a blood trail also spills out as it runs away, but the blood inside the chest when I remove the lungs at gutting time makes me think I did my best to be getting a good quality meat. Maybe it doesn't even matter... I just looked at it like that since that was how we prepared animals back at butchering when I was a kid. But realistically any safe effective shot that puts meat in the freezer was a good one. - thejanitor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
Agree Janitor.

The more of that blood you can get out the better.

And the flip side of that coin is the sooner that deer is on the ground and not jumping the better.

It all comes down to balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
Early when I started deer hunting, I was told to shoot them through the shoulder to break it so they couldn't run. Well, I did that a few times and realized that deer can run with a broken shoulder. I also realized it ruined good meat. On a couple of occasions, I accidentally made a high behind shoulder shot (double lung) and noticed that it was quite effective. I began to read other folks talking about it and now that is all I do. It just plain works. Sometimes they are DRT, other times they run 30 yards. Either way, it doesn't take much tracking and you have a much larger target.

I did try a neck shot a couple of years ago just cause everyone brags on it. Deer was quartering toward me and the 30-06 went clean through and took off the opposing shoulder. Ruined it. I was not happy. Back to the double lung high shoulder for me....No ruined meat.

Started casting boolits a few years ago and shot a buck using the double lung with my 7mm-08 using a 135grain RNGC boolit at about 2150. DRT. Something magical about the cast boolits. I can't explain it.

Rosewood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
i'v seen alot of neck shots by alot of guys. either the deer was dead right there or they missed clean. i never seen a wounded neck shot. head shot can be a bad deal if the shooter don't under stand where the brain is.
How do you know it was a clean miss? Just cause you didn't find blood doesn't mean it was a clean miss. I figure a neck is 6-10" across, most bullets are 0.300" across and that is a lot of room for error if you don't get the spine or jugular.

Rosewood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,450 Posts
Many years ago, I was in a stand in heavy woods, and saw a rather large buck trying to "sneak" through a patch of mountain laurel about 40 yards away. There were no leaves on the bushes, so I could clearly see him, but when I raised my gun and looked through the scope, I could never find a big enough opening in the thicket to aim and shoot through on a good target section of the deer. I was using a .243.

Being young and foolish, I decided that rather that have him walk away, I would aim right at his shoulder, based on his overall clear silouette, even if there was no totally clear opening, and hope for the best.

After I shot, he jumped about 5 feet up in the air like a kangaroo, and ran off really fast. I was really sick about it I just knew my bullet had deflected, and that I had missed him. My brother walked up about 5 minutes later, and asked about the shot, and I told him I had missed.

So, he walked over to where I said the deer was and looked, and said, that no I hadn't

I went over, and there was a huge splash of bright orange (Tennessee Vols orange) blood on the ground. From there, there were two bright orange gushing blood trails, about two feet apart, leading down the mountain side. We walked on down about 35 yards through the woods and he was stone cold dead.

The bullet had deflected, and had accidentally became a high lung shot. It may have even gone in wobbling from its contact with the brush.

So, my best double lung shot ever was by mistake.

Mannyrock
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,467 Posts
neck shot at long range has to much of a chance of wounding or causing a slow death. Up close and placed right it and a head shot will dump them though. At long range a shoulder shot is about the easiest shot to make and anchor an animal. Yes you do loose meat though. But given a choice id rather loose 5 lbs of meat then loose a whole deer. Me, I don't worry to much about a deer running a short distance. Ive tracked enough of them that its pretty much an art anymore. A double lung shot will about half the time dump them in there tracks. the other half you might see them go MAYBE a 100 yards. Little low you usually take out the heart. Little high and you hit the spine a little far back and you hit the liver. All kill shots. If you cant find a deer that ran a 100 yards you shouldn't be hunting. Id say most lost like that are lost by hunters that don't bother to even look for a deer. Don't know how many times ive heard hunters say they missed a shot and after asking them how they knew they missed they said the deer wasn't laying there dead!. Lung shots will kill! and about all you loose even with a high velocity rifle is some rib meat. Ive seen neck shot deer that had bloodshot meat down even down into the back straps or front shoulders. I shoot LOTS of deer every year and anymore I don't care if its 50 yards or 500 yards I shoot a couple inches behind the shoulder and wait till a deer presents me that shot or let it walk away. No deer is worth taking a chance of making a poor shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,920 Posts
shot placement is ALWAYS

CRITICAL!

the closer to the game, the better the chances of placing the shot correctly for a quick kill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,450 Posts
Good stuff Lloyd. I agree.

Also note, the closer the deer, the higher the chance of a bad, non-expanding through and through shot, a far running deer, leaving little or no blood trail, with a 30-06/.270/ 7 Mag class rifle. Seen it happen lots of time to lots of folks. 15 yard shot, deer gone for good. Not a problem with the slower 30 or 35 calibers, like the .30-30 or .35 Rem.

So, really close up, I have read that the solution is a neck shot, or to definitely break both shoulders. Otherwise, wait until they get further out.

Last time I had a shot like this from my stand, with my .308, a large doe was just 15 yards away. I didn't move a muscle and waited her out. Took 10 long agonizing minutes. Finally, she smelled me, tossed her tail, and ran. I mounted my rifle and just knew that she would stop out in the field and briefly look back. She did. I shot her through the front shoulder at about 85 yards. She only went about 10 feet after that. Probably the wisest shot I ever made.

Mannyrock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
Last time I had a shot like this from my stand, with my .308, a large doe was just 15 yards away. I didn't move a muscle and waited her out. Took 10 long agonizing minutes. Finally, she smelled me, tossed her tail, and ran. I mounted my rifle and just knew that she would stop out in the field and briefly look back. She did. I shot her through the front shoulder at about 85 yards. She only went about 10 feet after that. Probably the wisest shot I ever made.

Mannyrock
A 15 yard shot is one of the many reasons I keep my 1911 10mm on my hip always when hunting. Perfect for short shots.

Rosewood
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,428 Posts
neck shot at long range has to much of a chance of wounding or causing a slow death. Up close and placed right it and a head shot will dump them though. At long range a shoulder shot is about the easiest shot to make and anchor an animal. Yes you do loose meat though. But given a choice id rather loose 5 lbs of meat then loose a whole deer. Me, I don't worry to much about a deer running a short distance. Ive tracked enough of them that its pretty much an art anymore. A double lung shot will about half the time dump them in there tracks. the other half you might see them go MAYBE a 100 yards. Little low you usually take out the heart. Little high and you hit the spine a little far back and you hit the liver. All kill shots. If you cant find a deer that ran a 100 yards you shouldn't be hunting. Id say most lost like that are lost by hunters that don't bother to even look for a deer. Don't know how many times ive heard hunters say they missed a shot and after asking them how they knew they missed they said the deer wasn't laying there dead!. Lung shots will kill! and about all you loose even with a high velocity rifle is some rib meat. Ive seen neck shot deer that had bloodshot meat down even down into the back straps or front shoulders. I shoot LOTS of deer every year and anymore I don't care if its 50 yards or 500 yards I shoot a couple inches behind the shoulder and wait till a deer presents me that shot or let it walk away. No deer is worth taking a chance of making a poor shot.
Amen Brother! Couldn't say it better myself other than the head/neck shot. I will not take one unless I am being charged by an animal. My second wife did a head shot on a doe and dropped her. Walked up on her and she bleeted. went to cut the throat and she kicked the crap out of me. Top of the head and part of the brain was gone, but she wasn't dead until I put another in the top of her head. Have taken deer that had wounds to the neck or jaw. I won't do it, the deer will walk If I don't have a heart/lung shot. I've made a lot of tag soup, but a lot more game meat. I have taken at least one deer since moving to Montana in 78, for a while as many as 7 a year. The grocery store carries meat if I run out. I also don't shot at game much past 300 yd and will pass on that if i don't have a rock solid rest. Too many fools out there now days, bragging about 5-600 yd shots, standing with out a rest and "put it right where I was aiming, do it all the time". Yet they have on idea how much their bullet will drift in a 10mph breeze at 500 yd. Sorry, I'm off my soap box now. DP
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
663 Posts
I dont do head or neck shots. Too much of a chance and wounding and the animal suffering a slow death. You only have to be off a little bit to cut the trachea or jaw, and that is not a quick killing shot.

I like to hit them in the lungs. On public lands, I shoot for the shoulder. Ruins a little meat, but it puts them down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
If you watch a deer browsing or sneaking the head is never still. Snapped twig and the head can jerk 12" in a fraction of a second.

Very close, top down, totally unsuspecting deer coming straight at me. Yes I might go for a neck shot. Would probably be more base of the neck.

Otherwise, I'll wait for a good shot in the boiler room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
I had originally started using 100 gr bullet's in my 25-06. What I found was massive damage but deer just dropped where they were. Didn't like the damage so I moved up to a heavier bullet, 117 gr. Deer didn't just drop any more. That walked off maybe 10 or 15 yds and just laid down dead. I think deer that run off very far are a good indication of a poorly placed shot.

When I lived in Montana, I ran into a guy that said he'd shot an elk either three or four time's in the chest cavity and had to track it 20 mi. He was trying to justify a larger cartridge to me. Some of the stuff I've heard over the years of great shot's that failed really amaze me.

On a neck shot, I would do it in a heart beat but ranges needs to be fairly close. I believe in in shooting at the largest target to a point. That would be a lung shot just behind the shoulder. But a 50 yds a shot in the neck reduce's chance of being a bit off and ruining a bunch of meat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
While I have taken multiple neck shots on deer, I have never taken a head shot on one. No Texas heart shots either.
I was actually walking back to my truck one day a few years ago about mid-day and had a small doe walk out of the woods and stop and stare at me from 10 yards. I slipped my 44 Blackhawk from the holster and took a good two handed grip. She was just standing there, in a straight line with me. I aimed at the base of the neck and she dropped on impact and just twitched. I didn't hit bone but she was down.

I read an article once that makes some sense to me. Something about the hydrostatic shock of neck shots rupturing the blood vessels in the brain and causing immediate death. The article went on to say that one theory behind why some chest shot deer drop and others run had to do with if the heart valves were open when the bullet made impact. It was proposed that the shock wave travels through the open vessels and rupture the capillaries in the brain while closed valves stopped the shock wave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,740 Posts
The distance I have to shoot has always been important to me for taking a neck shot.Now that I'm old and shaky,I wouldn't risk an off hand neck shot over a few yards.Unlike back east where most deer are taken from tree stands,we do more walk and stalk type hunting here in the west. Shooting from a tree stand,you should already know about how far that deer is from your stand.And most of you will have a rest for the rifle. Out here,we need to be able to judge distance to the target. I have tested people at judging distances, and many have no clue.
Like 300 yds,when the target was only 150 or so.I have practiced judging distances in the field, and am close out to a few hundred yds.
If you don't know the general distance of your target,then all else could be a mute point.Especially in those long range shots.

These guys in the previous video I posted, knew the exact range of their target (Doe) and had their scope adjusted to it.Not good enough for a neck shot at that distance,but close enough for a boiler room shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,450 Posts
Fischer,

When I had my place in Tennessee, I hunted from stands with heavy woods in the back and a large field in front. I used a .308, with 150 grain core-lokt bullets. Most shots were 60 to 80 yards, on deer standing in the field, so fairly close. I always shot just behind the front shoulder, taking side shots only.

The deer always ran, at least 70 to 120 yards, often in a big looping circle, then they dropped dead in the field. I never lost one. They were very well placed shots. Very little meat damage.

The sole exception was once, when I accidentally shot low and right, and put it straight through the heart. The deer just collapsed.

Even on a great double lung shot, the deer will often run 80 to 100 yards, spouting blood.

So, I don't necessarily concur that a running deer is an indication of a poor shot. Here on the East Coast, with very large whitetails, a drt deer is simply not the norm.

Mannyrock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,030 Posts
There's a fella on another forum who thinks deer neck roast is the best part.

a neck shot that hits the backbone is going to destroy a LOT of meat.

a shoulder shot will probably destroy less.

an lung shot will destroy the least.

for me, I don't shoot moving animals anymore. and the head/neck shot is a chance to have it move... deer move their heads FAST. but the chest moves the slowest, giving you the best chance at a clean hit.

perforate them through the chest so they bleed out well, and leave a blood trail.
 
21 - 40 of 51 Posts
Top