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Hi

I have a Lab that's 16 months and weighs 85 lb. the breeder said he should be bigger than that because he's a Canadian/American Lab is this true my Vet said he's perfect size but the breeder says the Vet doesn't know what they are talking about she said they are probably under the impression that he an English Lab I guess I'm looking for other opinions.

Thanks In Advance for the help
 

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:D By 16 months he's about as big as he's going to get. I would think 85 lbs.should be big enough.I've seen labs from 55 to 120. Do you think your dog is too small? Some breeders like big dogs others like smaller. Size shouldn't affect his hunting. 8)
 

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Just saw this!

I raised 2 litters of yellows. My male is the "block head type", at his heaviest he was 120-125. His average weight is 115-20 or so.
My female was the "slender head type". She went about 67 pounds. The puppies, although I never saw but one fully grown, were a mix of the two.
One litter was split geneticaly right down the middle, half males, half female, have of each group block head, half of each group black nose, half pink. It was amazing.

When I was a teen my best friend had a lab that weighed 145-150. Just a big dog. Got upset with me once and put his mount around my thigh......I quickly let go of my friends sister!
 

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I would be glad that it is only 85 lbs as you can use it for upland still at 145 lbs, there is no way in **** it could truely cover ground in upland for any length of time - unless you were using it along with a pointer just to flush and retrieve. Large size helps a bit in goose/duck hunting as larger=stronger swimmer and allows the dog to maintain body temps in really cold climates ( higher thermal mass). Unless all I was going to do was duck/goose hunt, I would not want a lab over 80#. Given time, I am sure someone could breed labs that weighed 150 lbs consistently, but you might as well get a newfy. Larger dog also means shorter life span and higher risk of bloat( twisting of stomach(sp) that is not uncommon in large, deep chested dogs). All things considered, you are probably better off with the size that you have.
 

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Howdy,

Pardon my newbie status and strong opinions, but I have owned, bred, trained and trialed Labs for nearly 20 years.

Size, Proportion and Substance
Size--The height at the withers for a dog is 22½ to 24½ inches; for a bitch is 21½ to 23½ inches. Any variance greater than ½ inch above or below these heights is a disqualification. Approximate weight of dogs and bitches in working condition: dogs 65 to 80 pounds; bitches 55 to 70 pounds.
http://www.akc.org/breeds/recbreeds/labdoret.cfm

This is directly from the AKC standard for the Lab breed. And while the AKC is not the best thing for dogs, it sure beats some breeder telling you he's got some kind of border hybrid.

There has been a trend to bigger and bigger Labs. This is NOT to the betterment of the breed. A working dog must work long hours on his feet and he must be capable of completing versatile tasks. As jdbe pointed out there are health problems associated with these oversized dogs. Stomach torsion, hip dysplasia and OCD shoulder are just a few.

In my opinion (obviously not humble) you should be grateful that your dog is in the 85 pound range. An excellent size, a bit large, but still manageable. If you ever hunt from a canoe, you'll be looking for that 60 pound bitch.

Best of luck training. Adios,
 

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My purebred Yellow is 86 lbs. last time we weighed him. Like Finnigan said you don't want them too big especially if they are overwieght. That leads to many of the health problems he describes. My wife works at a Vet clinic and is always talking about most pets are overweight (like most Americans probably) and that is bad. We keep all our pets on a strict diet of QUALITY food (don't buy the cheap stuff, it's really bad for them) and they are all very healthy.
 

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I'm a Labrador Retriever owner. As a Newfoundlander, that isn't too unusual, since they were developed here on the Island, along with the Newfoundland Dog. Both were meant to be big dogs with lots of stamina that handled the cold well.

You have to realize that our salt water: The North Atlantic, is rarely over 1 degree Celcius in Summer. You have less than 12 minutes before hypothermia sets in if you go in the water unprotected by a Mustang survival suit, wet, dry suit. Unless you have lots of "natural" protection, you aren't coming out alive after an hour or two. We use our Labs to retrieve sea ducks, turrs (murres), snipe and bull birds that are shot from shore and when a floating jigger can't reach them.

At the same time, we use them in fresh water as well, and they do retrieve their fair share of blacks, mallards, teal, wood, goldeneye ducks, as well as Canada Geese. However, the water is again extremely cold. At the height of summer, fresh water ponds, lakes rarely have water temps above 15 degrees C. You can imagine what the water is like in October/November. We have had snow as late as June and as early as September, so you need a big dog with lots of strength and stamina to handle the elements.

That strength and stamina also comes in handy during late season partridge/ruffed grouse/spruce grouse hunts over snow covered bogs and barrens. Snow shouldn't bother him.

My six month old pup Bruiser(male, chocolate), is about 75 lbs right now and still growing. I have swithched him to Medi-Cal Adolescent, it is a specially formulated dry dog food available from my vet. It evens out growth spurts for large breed dogs and allows them to grow at a steadier pace without undue stress being put on joints and bones. They grow just as big, but at a pace that is easier on their system overall. Bruiser is in top physical shape and is not an obese dog by any stretch of the imagination. He has absolutely no problems handling water work, despite the cold.

I think smaller Labs and the AKC conformation standards, etc... is a by-product of the English influence and show-dog cirucit that has been the ruin of many a great breed. Labs are meant to be working dogs who are happiest playing in one of the harshest climates in North America, not dog show dandies. I asked my Grandfather about it, and he told me that our Labs had always been big dogs, as far back as he could remember and was the same in his grandfather's day.

Bruiser will break 100 lbs, if not more, and I don't see that as "undesireable" despite what the AKC "Standard" says. Look what such arbitrary descriptions and subsequent breeding has done to breeds like the Irish Setter? God help us if our Labs end up the same way...
 

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As I posted prev, I would not want a large one as I use them for both waterfowl and upland, but the last post did raise some valid points. if you are wanting a dog for lareg, cold waters then big is better and stamina of swimming is needed above all else. A large dog is best there - who cares if it cannot run all day for upland game as it will only be used for brief periods to retrieve - even if it is long retrieves in strong currents. a large dog is best in that situation only as weight does not hurt them in water and greater thermal mass willhelp regulate body temp. If you are looking for that, then get a damned newfy lol.

also, AKC is not god by any means, but they do set standards that maintain the integrity of the breeds. Look around you and you will see more crappy Labs out there due to poor breeding. Man has the ability to really create some messed up breeds ( pugs and bulldogs are great examples of truely usless breeds - ****, a bulldog cannot even give birth naturally 9 times out of 10 and requires a c- section). My point is that keeping to AKC standards is the best way to ensure we maintain the ability of the hunting dog to hunt!!!!! A hundred pound lab is not a lab - not to say that it is not a good dog - just that it should not be bred or bred for.
 

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How big is too big!

:roll: jdbe has made some good points, but "a hundred pound Lab is not a Lab"! and they should not be bred or bred for". GIVE ME A BREAK!!!!!! We have a 124 lb Male LAb and a 76 lb Female Lab that our vets compliment on how healthy and well built they are. Everything I have researched on the Lab breed leads me to believe that they were bred to fall between golden retrievers and Chessies, a well tempered family dog but still big and tough enough to handle the cold temps and stressfull workouts. Now if these two points you just made are to be taken seriously then maybe the AKC should pull their heads out of their butts and do away with the 13 inch and 15 inch Beagle classifications! I am not trying to be a sarcastic! But this shows me that there are good uses for two different sizes of rabbit dogs according to the AKC! So I feel that yes 150 lb Lab is probably too big due to health reasons but if you want a golden retriever size dog maybe you should buy a golden retriever, and if I want big Labs or small Labs then I should buy a big Lab or a small Lab. By AKC standards our female is on the big side and our male is too big, BUT WHATS REALLY COOL WE GET BIG PUPS AND LITTLE PUPS, so it just goes to show everyone has opinions and they are always going to be different.
 

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And many of them stink - opinions that is lol. But to each his own. it is a proven fact that the larger the dog, the shorter the life and the more likelyhood of issues like bloat, blown acl's........
Just take one of your 150 pound labs out for a day in the field with some other normal sized labs and see who gets tired first. It all depends on what you use them for. If you only want a duck hunting dog, then a 150# would be great. if you want an all around hunting dog, then a 150# one is of very little use.

I think people get way too sensitive about subjects like this due to the fact that animals are part of our families. There will always be that odd 150# lab that lives to be 15 years old with no health problems - ****, I saw a 17 year old golden running around in the park two years ago. You just have to use your best judgement
 
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