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Discussion Starter #1
I have a new Ruger Hawkeye and am getting ok accuracy - 2" - 21/2" groups at 200 yards. I was talking with one of the guys at the range and he said that neck sizing the brass would improve the accuracy. I have been full length sizing. My question is will it be enough of a difference to justify the $30 for a neck sizing die? I've been reloading for years, but have always FL sized rifle cases. Comments?
 

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i have never seen a reason to do one or the other, other than full-length sizing is harder on cases and they wear out faster.

as for accuracy, i have not seen any difference. then again, i don't shoot at 200 yards much.

-Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I left out some details. Trigger was good out of the box. I've tried nine different bullets from four manufacturers ranging in weight from 40 - 55 grains, three different powders with charges ranging from min to almost max, OAL has been measured and is about .020 off the lands.
 

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Neck sizing the brass might improve the accuracy. Actually, you can neck size with a full length sizing die. Just adjust the die, so the case isn't sized all the way to the shoulder.

Two inch groups at 200 yards would mean you're shooting 1 MOA groups. In my opinion, a 22-250 shot in a quality firearm with the right bullet and powder should get at least 0.5 to 0.75 MOA groups.

You also might consider using match primers; they sometimes make a difference in accuracy.
 

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What are your expectations for this rifle?
I honestly believe it should shoot sub moa. I do not think switching to neck sizing will shrink your groups by 1" or more. Since you hand load play with bullet and powder combinations and then seating depths
 

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If you are F/L resizing, try putting a dime on each side of your die between the locking ring and the top of the press and then tighten it down. Resize, oh, 15 or 20 cases like that and then do everything else exactly like you do with the F/L cases. Then F/L 15 or 20 cases and charge them up and have a shoot off.
I use a flat washer that's about the thickness of a dime with a hole in it that will fit on the body of the die. I put that between the lock ring and the top of the press and resize my cases. After a couple of resizings, you'll get a kinda little doughnut bulge around the neck of the case right at the shoulder. This doesn't do any harm and I think it helps align the case. After the cases have been resized several times (depending on your load) they'll get hard to chamber because they've blown out to nearly fit the chamber. Then I remove the washer, F/L resize them, and start over. I, of course, keep an eye on the case length and neck thickness. I find it's easier doing it this way than re-adjusting the dies with those damnable little screws just waiting to strip.
 

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Consider getting a Lee neck collet die. You will not need any lube what so ever when you size the neck that way. The cost? &17 for the Collet die alone $25 for the whole set including the neck collet die. Not only do you not need lube, it does a good job of keeping the necks straight. I have three sets of them and will be getting more.
 
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