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Seems an awful lot of the recreational cannons are smoothbores. But years ago, I stumbled on a cannon shoot out in the Oregon Desert near Fort Rock and several of the fellows were shooting Parrot-style and other rifled guns. Most of the shooting was over when I stopped by, but after looking at some paper targets I was astonished by the accuracy of the guns. Seems like a couple of them were built using surplus anit-aircraft barrels -- Bofors, maybe? Anyway, do any of you shoot rifled guns? I was thinking that even a black powder rifle barrel set up for, say, that Lyman .69 conical, would be fun converted to a cannon barrel.
 

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Bill -

There have been several references to these in the past, so there ARE folks here that use them.

Also there are several surplus sites that market sections of most every caliber of modern cannon out there.
 

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guardsgunner said:
I shoot a rifled 1.5 full size civil war gun. Rifled ourselves. our new project will use a surpluss barrel.

I'd love to see pix or at least a discussion on the rifling process!
Did you build special equipment for this?
Cut rifling I presume?
It would be well worth starting a new thread!
 

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Cut rifling I presume?
It would be well worth starting a new thread!
Please do :grin:
 

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I think I lost all of the pictures I had saved on my former computer when it went belly up. I will look.
I made a rack & pinion type machine.Rack is attached to a sine bar that gives the rate of twist, as it moves forward on the bar the rack moves under the pinion gear rotating the cutter head. I started with the carriage on linear bearing but changed it to a I beam to make it more rigid.
 

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Charcoal: Found Big Sky using Google, but they sure aren't giving away any barrels!
Guardsgunner: How many lands/grooves and what is your wtist rate in the 1.5-inch gun?
Anyone: When Parrot had his 10-pounder rifles cast at the West Point Foundry, did they use a rifled mandrel to cast around, or did they rifle after casting? Original Parrot twist rate, anyone?
 

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BillinOregon said:
Charcoal: Found Big Sky using Google, but they sure aren't giving away any barrels!
Nope,but if BATFE gets its way :cry: on the importation of barrels not found suitable for sporting purposes,the current price may seem like a bargain :shock: .

I guess we will be back to making barrels again.Although beyond my capabilities at this time,Im looking forward to any info on making your own rifled tubes.Has anyone looked into ECM for rifled big bores?
 

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BillinOregon,
Parrott's were rifledafter casting. If I recallcorrectly, the rate is one in 126". I will look in the Ord. manual when I get a chance.
Rate on mine is 1:60" 15 L&G . aprox. 28 deep.

We went with the original(or close) rate of twist of the gun we copied.
 

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A rifled barrel is very appealing. Most of us have probably seen the History Channel show where the accuracy of rifles barrels was shown. It also showed the cannoneers machining each round out of zinc on a lathe.

Has anybody calculated the largest size bore where a lead Minie ball round would be safe? I know 0.58" is since I shoot Minie balls in my repro rifle. The More Complete Cannoneer has some figures for max weight of a projectile. A lead Minie ball would be cheap to shoot in a smaller barrel and it would be fun to get some real accuracy.

Steve
 

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Would the Lyman 12 gauge one ounce hollow base slug work?
 

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As I recall, the Parrott has gain twist rifling. I will check the AOP folio tonight.
 

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“Field Artillery Weapons of the Civil War” Revised Edition on page 109 states for the 2.9-inch (10-pounder) Parrott Rifles, Federal. “Its rifling had a 2.9-inch land diameter, right-hand gain twist (more rapid spin toward the muzzle), with three broad flat lands and grooves sensibly equal in width”.

Also on page 111, for the Confederate 2.9-inch (10-pounder) Parrott Rifles.

“A drawing dated 12 June 1861, discovered during the recent restoration of Tredegar Foundry, was probably a draftsman’s concept of an actual Federal 2.9-inch (10-pounder) Parrott rifle. Two of its details deserve attention:

1. It defines the twist of the rifling as one revolution in 16 feet.”

Note: the anonymous draftsman may not have measured the Federal Parrott or was told not to specify.
 

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First off I'd like to say Hi. I've never posted here before but I've been lurking around reading this forum like a kid in a candy store. My original interest when I found it and still is was to find information building a flintlock.

I ran across this post tonight and had to head for the bookshelf for something that has been in my wifes family forever. It's an 1864 translation of an 1861 French book titled "The Movement of Projectiles From Rifled Cannon". It was translated, so the title page says, by W. LeROY BRAUN lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Richmond Arsenal. There is a table near the back that gives the specifications of several guns (didn't count but I think about 20 or so). On the 10 pounder Parrot it gives the following: Length of Helix 16 feet and the number of grooves is 3. There is a little more info there but I hesitate to flatten this thing out in the scanner being that it is close to 150 years old.

If anyone is interested I'll try to take a good picture of this page with the digital camera and post it. Doubt the copyright, if it ever had one, is still good> :grin:

Heck, I'm only about 50 miles fom Vicksburg and work puts me over there once or twice a month. There is bound to be a 10 pounder in the park somewhere to measure from. :roll:

Rick
 

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I've only skimmed through sections of it. I have wanted to figure out how to copy it for some time so I could actually sit down and read it. It looks as though Broun (spelled right this time) did not do a direct translation but presented the theories from the original book in his own words as they pertained to the equipment they had at hand with references to weapons they were producing and using thus the table I mentioned. The equations he has are presented to show that experiments could be made with smaller caliber weapons and what was learned could be directly applied to the larger stuff as long as you accounted for certain things.

For a time that had no electronic measuring devices like chonos and such they were getting a darn good grasp on what was going on and how to control it.

I'll try to post some pictures of pages tonight.

Rick

A little history. The book I believe was originally in the library in Natchez, MS. They had a fire down there some time ago and sold off books to collectors to pay for rebuilding the library. My Wifes grandfather was an avid book collector and evidently bought a ton of stuff at that time. Most of it was sold to another collector in Vicksburg after he past but I saw this one when they were going through things and couldn't put it down. My wife ended up bringing it home :lol:
 

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Rick -

As DD said you're doubley welcome!

You have an historical treasure. It should be taken to a University Library where it can be microfilmed before the paper disintegrates.

At least have it scanned.

Check to see what it would cost. I'm sure we could take up a collection and cover it for access to a copy or e-copy.

Thanks,

Tim K.
 
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