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Discussion Starter #1
I want to pick up a gun for my grandson who will be 13 yrs. old next season for varmint/deer. He's not big for his age so something in a low recoil caliber and relatively short LOP would be appropriate. We'll be hunting in northern NY woods 100yds.or less will be the norm. I like the idea of a single for safety reasons and non-intimidating starter. Would a Marlin or Winchester pump in 30/30 be a decent starter?

savageT
 

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You can't go wrong with the marlin, as long as he's large enough to handle the size. If not you might consider a contender with a youth stock. KN
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the help. I want to correct a mistake I made initially. I meant to say would a Marlin or Win Lever carbine in 30/30 be appropriate?


savageT
 

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This question is a follow-up to "Splended Ha Ha" reply.
I just looked up the T/C Contender Carbine site, and they show a photo of their Contender pistol........sayin something about being in pre-production and testing.
Have they got a carbine on the shelves, or still promoting an unseen product? I like the idea of the 22 rf and 30/30 barrels. Will these be interchangable by the consumer? I like the NEF/H&R Handi-Rifles.
 

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The last three years or so I've been out the local Game Commission Range, seen an awful lot of adults kinda crouched over 13/14 year olds shooting' the NEF Youth models in 243. The kids seem ta be happy enough with them. Out ta the 100 yds you're talking about, an actually somewhat farther than that, the 243 does just fine. Most of the kids didn't seem to have any problem with the recoil, an' it's a light rifle, so the weight was no problem.
They're as accurate as most other rifles out there, so there's no penalty there. Actually, I think the Contenders are even uglier than the NEF's in an Art Deco kinda way.
 

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Grandson's Rifle

Hay Jim: I was going to recommend a NEF, because I've heard so much about them. I've seen a couple at shows and on the shelves and to me they are not bad to look at - just the sort of thing a 13 year old could really love his old grandpa for. Wonder if you can find them in 6.5x55, hmmmm? The 243 caliber sounds like a good bet but I'm just wondering about that 6.5 caliber. I wonder if they come in the 260 caliber - almost the same ballistics as the 6.5.

Gee, do you think a nice Model 38 would be too heavy for him? Could shorten the stock for a better fit. Then the both of you could shoot 6.5s and for instructional purposes he could shoot single shot to learn.

Just my two cents Jim. Mikey here. Hi to Peg.
 

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Your handle is appropriate because I'd highly recommend a Savage bolt-action in .243. I've sold several to local deer hunters here in central Texas and their kids love the rifle, and it's a great buy. Savage has really improved their quality in the last few years and makes excellent products. For example they are well thought of in the high-end benchrest arena.

You may be stuck on a lever action but I've seen too many youngsters shoot a 30-30 lever-action winchester or even the heavier Marlin and have a problem with the recoil. A 30-30 in a single shot is even worse for a youngster. Do your son a favor and go with a bolt action. If you go with the savage in .243 you can rebarrel it later (even yourself) to a larger more potent caliber when he puts on a few years and pounds. The Savage's have a barrel attachment system that makes it relatively easy to rebarrel, as long as you go with a similar length cartridge. For example it would be relative easy to later upgrade a .243 to a .308 with only a barrel change. You could buy the standard Savage package and have the stock shortened for your son or go with the "youth" package. You can get it completely outfitted with a 3x9 scope, sling, synthetic stock, and hard carrying case. All in all, I feel it is the best price vs feature package on the market.

Just offering another option to consider. Wayne
 

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I think I would go with either a T/C contender or a NEF single shot in 30/30. You stated that the shots would be in a wooded area and under 100 yds. Any factory load would work well to 200yds and if you handload you can use something like the Nosler 150 gr BT and extend the range just a little if needed. It will have low recoil and a larger diameter bullet than the .243. The T/C as stated above would allow you to change barrels to other cartridges when needed. The plus for the NEF is the lower initial cost.
Just my 2 cents worth.
BruceP
 

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:D For what it is wourth guys I would go with the single shots fer the kid. It teaches em a lot of things,and one of em aint about spraying rounds all over after the critters. I like the two (2) barrel idea about having a .22 and then a deer size cartridge also. I kinda lean toward the 30-30 and the .308 types. They be good guns to teach em how ta shoot,and trigger control. Just my 10 cents worth,cause I could not find a nickle..King :)
 

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I'd vote for the TC carbine also, but not in .30-30. Nothing wrong with the .30-30, except the recoil. I bought my son-in-law a .243 and he took a beautiful buck with it at a little over 300 yds. The .243 is a great deer cartridge that will double as a varmint round in the off season. The recoil is low, and the killing power is more than adequate for deer.
Available bullet selection is good whether you reload or not. You can get them as light as 75 grs, and as heavy as 135 grs., and everything inbetween. The ammo is reasonable, and on sale every fall!
 

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If I were to get a single shot for a 13 year old, I would consider the 243 Win (use 100 grain Nosler partitions), the 25-06 Rem, 260 Rem, 270 Win.

I would absolutely forget a 30-30, I dont care if you say 100 yds or not. Let's get real here, the 30-30 has horrible ballistics by today's standards. Get your boy a rifle that has a relatively flat ballistics capable of up to 250-300 yard shots. I started out with a 30-30 also, and I surely understand it's shortcomings, which are "many". I am as aware of it's history as anyone else, but that is not even near the top of my favorite deer caliber list. Limiting anyone to a 100 yd rifle is rediculous. As soon as you do, he will see the buck of his dreams at 225 yards. Make the right decision and get him a good deer caliber that is also "flat shooting".
 
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