Graybeard Outdoors banner
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
I have tried the sanded in finishes and they are beautiful but very time consuming. Also it is quite easy to sand too vigorously and alter the stocks shape. I have tried many different finishes and for the weatherby shine I use a polyurethane made to be hand applied(it is simply very thin). They recommend a cloth but I prefer my hand. For oil I use the Watco Danish oil finish first. It is thin and slow to dry. I heat the wood with an electric heat gun(heat until holding the stock is uncomfortable) and apply the material liberally, keeping the entire stock wet (especially watch the end grain areas) until the stock is thoroughly cooled. I let the stock rest until the finish thickens and rub it vigorously with the hand. The remenants of this coat are rubbed off cross grain with a lint free cloth.. I like old cotton bedsheets. This is done twice, The second may not be needed. Most times a single application is sufficient. Allow this to thoroughly dry, 24-48 hours. I use TruOil as a topcoat. It dries harder than the Watco but not as hard as the tung finishes. It is steel wooled (0000) between coats, just to knock down the shine, read very lightly. The last coats are applied using as little material as one can and still let the hand slide over the wood for just a little while. Usually just 5-7 drops per side of the stock and scuffing may be allowed to go 2-3 coats. When sufficient finish is built up the stock is allowed to thoroughly dry. It is then very lightly steel wooled with 0000 wool and a wax is applied. I am still experimenting with waxes but haven't found any real standouts. Almost anything with carnuba works just fine. I have a new type of french finishing wax, perhaps it'll be the 'final answer'. The final rubbing out will determine the gloss. It steel fur is used, it will produce a low gloss sheen. If one uses textured cloth such as denum(sp.) more gloss will be produced. If this final rubbing is omitted the waxing will produce almost as much gloss as the TruOil alone. I used tung oil many years ago and really liked the look, but found the finish it produced would crack if allowed to get very hot, as in a closed car. Also it seemed a more delicate finish than waxed TruOil. The finish I described mimics the finish found on many of the pre-64 M70's... and is fairly easy to fix and maintain.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top