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Discussion Starter #1
I finally lost my 30 yr old can of linseed oil and turpentine, I don't remember the ratio, and I was curious as what's considered the best oil
for restoring dry old stocks ? Any advise appreciated.
Regards fredj
 

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I've read some good things about Lin-speed oil but I've never used it myself. I don't think I'd ever finish a firearm with linseed oil again however after finding out that rags with that on them can spontaneously combust.
 

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I used Tung Oil (available at any hardware store) on the stock for my Hawken. I like the natural finish look of the wood and it brings out any grain nicely. As you use the gun it will darken up and give it an "antique" look.
 

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fredj, on that squirrel gun I just finished I used equal parts of tung oil, linseed oil, BC "Tru oil", the tung oil like said before really brings out the grain the linseed oil keeps the natural oils in the stock and the tru-oil helps protect and seal the wood against the elements. I've used this method (hand rubbed) for a number of years. It doesn't take much of this solution to complete a stock. As dry as it is out here in the desert it takes about 24 hours to dry. Then I use a 0000 steel wool and lightly polish the wood with the grain. Use a clean dry cloth, and wipe clean, and repeat. It usually takes me about a week, but most folks that see my refinished stocks seem to think they're something special. RR
 

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Discussion Starter #6
RR- Your method sounds about the best I've heard so far, I know I much prefer an oil finish to any poly as when you get scratches with an oil finish
they disappear when rubbed out, with the poly its a different story, and the oil finish has a subtle elegance no varnish could ever achieve.
I got bored waiting for my new Pedersoli double so I used some stripper on my old English double and removed all the varnish oil and crud that's accumulated over the last 130 to 140 years, I figure it's hardly a major
collectors item and deserves to be cleaned up as it's served me admirably
I used a fine brass brush to get all the crud out of the checkering, it came out really nice and the stock was dry as a bone and sucked up the boiled linseed oil like crazy, I'll get some Tru oil and tung oil as well.
Hope the Squirrel rifle loads are coming along.
Regards fredj
 

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River Runner, sounds like you got a great idea. I refinished a CVA Trapper stock a couple of months ago. I tried boiled linseed first and didn't like that by itself. Then I used Birchwood Casey Tru Oil as it comes from the jar. That turned out ok, but too glossy and "modern" looking for my taste. I think your blend sounds like it would do the job just right!
By the way, what river do you run? I live on the Mississippi in Minneapolis.

Buckshot Liam
 

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stock finishing oil

fredj- I just finsished a H & A underhammer with maple stock and I should say HARD maple. I've found that the species of wood used will have various needs for good results. American black walnut will soak up lots of straight linseed and get very dark; if that's what you want ok. If you want a lighter color use the tung oil. With any drying oil (tung, linspeed or truoil) I like to use synthetic steelwool pads between coats.
These look like the green scrub things the little woman has in the kitchensink. They are much preferable to steel wool in that they don't break up and leave scrap strands behind and are cleaner to work with. They are washable too. When you have the last coat dried on use the 0000 grade pad to reduce the shine and it makes the wood look dry as though it has no finish at all.
Maple is so hard it does not absorb much finish so I use straight linseed thinned 4 to 1 and slather it on and let it set and periodically slather more to keep it from drying. After a couple days of this I wipe the excess off and rub out with, you guessed it, 00 syn. steelwool pad, then 3-4 coats of tung oil and fininsh with 0000 pad. These will produce ultra smooth and durable finish that is easily maintained.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank' you all for your excellent advice, I've learned a bunch, now I'm going to try some of these idea's on my rifles
Regards fredj
 
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