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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was shooting my 45 LC Saturday for the first time in a while. This barrel is a straight 45LC barrel and not a 45/410. The brass split down the length of the cartridge on two out of three rounds. Th split was in the same place in the chamber. Primers looked normal, kick was normal and there was no other signs of high pressure. These rounds were in a group of 50 reloads and about half had been shot last summer with no problems.

These cases had only been loaded twice. The first time they were on the warm side, but still not near the max. loads for the T/C in the Hornady book. The current loading is down near the crossover point between standard 45LC's and the hotter Contender/Ruger loads.

I am really puzzled why two out of three rounds did this and the others I shot last summer were all fine.

Any ideas?
 

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Bullseye,
Check the cases. The only time I have heard of this happening the cases turned out to be 44 mag cases.

PaulS
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good thought Paul since I was shooting a 44 Mag the same day. The cases are head stamped 45 Colt though. It is Remington brass.
 

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This has happened to me in some other calibers, though not in .45 Colt. I have read that normal seasonal temperature heating/cooling cycles will harden brass gradually over several cycles. Maybe this is true, maybe it isn't, but I know that some brass that was just fine when I loaded it that was left to sit a couple of years before firing split much as you have indicated. Maybe that's your problem. Give some thought to the history of this particular lot of brass. Therein may lie your answer.

RonF
 

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Are you full length resizing? Don't! In the TC you should always resize just enough so that it takes a snap to shut the barrel. This especially true using stout loads. (And very important with bottleneck cartridges like .223 and 7TCU)

Excessive resizing over works brass and hardens it making it brittle. The brass gets over worked twice using stout loads and will harden even faster.

Also keep in mind that there is .007 difference between minimun brass dimension and maximum chamber dimension. That's alot of squeezing and expanding for a piece of brass.
 
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