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Some of you who are regulars on some of the bullet making boards will recall that I’ve had some questions and concerns about a flat tipped (slightly concave actually) version of my .35 calibre bullet design. Since my bullets have metallic tips, I’ve been concerned that the recoil impact in tubular magazines would set off the primers. Here are pictures of my basic design and the flat tipped version. I apologize for the condition of some of these pictures, but it was my first try with a new camera, and the flash made some of them very bright.





The tips, in the configuration I want to make them, have a meplat of .210 inches. This is the exact size of a bullet primer, so I feared that any slightly off-centre impact might set-off the primer ahead of it in the tube.

Last fall I acquired a Winchester 94 AE in .356 Winchester which, I believe, is the most powerful .35 calibre cartridge chambered in a rifle with a tubular magazine.

The test I contrived was to load live primers in .356 brass with my bullets to a weight sufficient to simulate a loaded cartridge, and then load them in the magazine and fire live rounds in the rifle, examining the “dummy” rounds to see if there was any damage to the primers or primer detonation. I was of the opinion that with the primer being the only combustible, that even if detonation occurred, the effect would be minimal presenting no danger to myself as shooter or the gun. I also surmised that the heavier the cartridge over-all weight, the greater the recoil impact and greater the possibility of detonation.

Since the maximum bullet weight shown for the .356 is shown as 250 grains, and a maximum powder charge is around 50 grains, I decided to swage 300 grain flat tip bullets for this experiment. I also decided to roll a cannelure on them in order to make the case/bullet co0mbination as solid as possible thus increasing the possibility of detonation. In the first picture, you’ll notice that the cannelure appears to be way too far forward on the bullet, but I did this to accommodate the over-all length of the cartridge as per the specs. I also ran some of the bullets farther into my point former making the meplats even smaller than the .210 I normally would be shooting. The second picture shows some of the loaded cartridges. The third picture shows the tips of the bullets I used in my testing. I had two “standard”, two “medium” and two “small” tips.







After each shot I unloaded the gun and examined the primers of all the bullets, replacing them before the next shot.

My early shots showed no detonations and no marks whatsoever on the primers. I switched the order of the cartridges in the magazine in order to, be sure I was getting accurate results.

I then altered the number of cartridges in the magazine, trying several shots with 4 and then two bullets in the tube.

I found absolutely no sign of any impact marks or detonations in the bullets I tested. The only marks were “wear” marks where the tips rubbed against the primers of the bullets ahead because of the repeated loadings and un-loadings, and some slight indentations where the firing pin of the rifle touched the primers, again in loading and unloading. The picture I took of these didn’t turn out well at all, but in the cartridge on the left, you may be able to detect some of this.



All in all, I’m now very confident in hunting with these bullets in my ’94, and I wouldn’t hesitate to allow someone else to do so as well.
 

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Rick, you have done your technical homework very well and are to be congratulated for your technique, diligence and concern. HOWEVER ( I hate that word), the American legal system will treat that as no account. If one of your bullets causes, or is claimed to cause a unplanned firing in the good 'ol USA, you will see the judge. You can sell 20 billion bullets, but just have one incident and you'll have big problems in America. Remington's one (ONE out of hundreds of thousands) m870 barrel split (how it happened was irrelevant, the fact that it did was the legal point) cost it $millions$. Anyone involved in firearms and/or ammunition production has to have counsel on retainer. Not only that, but any supplier to those companies ( copper and lead mines on up the production, fabrication and marketing chain) usually ends up getting named as an associate party to the law suit. Yes, we have degenerated to the lowest level of idiocy when it comes to firearms and ammo. 8)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
talon:

If I ever get around to selling bullets it sounds like I shouldn't offer flat tips in the US.

After all of the BS with the Treaty of the Americas and 911 it is highly unlikely that I'd ever be able to openly sell bullets to the US anyhow. It would be easier for me to export to Africa, Australia or Europe than a western hemisphere country.
 

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Hi Rick :D

You did a very good job on you presentation, and I enjoyed it throughly. Your bullets, looked very nice. Enjoyed it, keep up the good work.

Now has anybody thought about making a Video, or DVD, ? About bullet Swaging of course, the whole pictue of the operation`s.?

Come on guy`s, somebody give it a try, RICK?

Yeah I know, go to Corbins site, but I think there is a market out there guy`s for a (monkey see, monkey do) video or dvd. Yea, I`m one of them monkeys :-D

bullet maker :D
 

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A couple of years ago, I suggested that talon make such a video - he wasn't enthusiastic either.

I guess we're all a little camera shy. :oops:
 
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