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The American Revolution touched on Philip Gentzler and his family. Initially, the outbreak of war between American colonies and the British government had very little impact on the back country of North Carolina. The Revolution, in fact, did not have universal support among the local Germans. Many of these immigrants had, upon their landing in America, given an oath of allegiance to the English King. They felt a sense of gratitude to the Crown, for allowing their immigration. The Germans had found thier local government officials, most of whom were English or Scotch-Irish, to be unconcerned with their needs and grievances. That these same officials were now the leaders of the Rebel faction, no doubt, caught many of these Dutchman wrong. By and large, most Germans just wanted to be left out of the war, as most felt it was not thier struggle. There were, however, may significant exceptions, and Germans served as Tories and as Whigs in the bitter fighting that took place near Philip Gentzler's farm.
In January 1779, the local government officials changed the name of their county from Tyron to Lincoln County, in honor of the patriot General Benjamin Lincoln. In May 1780, the British captured the large American garrison at Charleston, South Carolina. The Revolutionary War had now moved to the southern colonies. A large veteran British army under the capable leadership of General Lord Charles Cornwallis was landed in Charleston, and Cornwallis began a slow march northward. Spured by British recruiters, local Tories began to gather at the mill of Derrick Ramsour. Philip Gentzler's farm was only one mile south of Ramsour's Mill. By late June, some 1,100 Tories had been dispersed by the better organized Whig militias. Philip Gentzler was 39 at the time, and there is no evidence that he participated in the Battle of Ramsour's Mill. His friend and neighobr was Adam Reep, a noted Whig scout, who led the Whig forces to the Tory camp, suggested the plan of attack, and fought in the battle. If Philip was not on the battlefield, he cold certainly hear the struggle from his farm. The wounded problably sought his barn out as a place of refuge.
in October of 1780, an even larger battle was fought between Whig and Tory partisans twelve miles to the south of Philip's home. The Battle of King's Mountain was another significant American victory and deprived the approaching Cornwallis of local suppor for his tired army. Critical to the victory at King's Mountain was the courageous actions of the "South Fork Boy," a company of Lincoln County men. In January 1781, General Daniel Morgan annihilated the lift wing of Cornwallis's army under Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Cowpens, South Carolina. Morgan retreated northward with Cornwallis's 4,000 troops in pursuit. Wth the Americans having alread crossed the Catawba River, the British, stopped at Ramsour's Mill, the site of the earier battle. It was now winter, 25 January 1781, Cornwallis wrote in his journal, "I therefore assembled the army on the 25th at Ramsour's mill on the sout fork of the Catawba, and as the loss of my light troops could only be remedied by the activity of the whole corps, I employed a halt of two days in collection some flour, and destroying superfluous baggage, and all my wagons except those loaded for sick and wounded." The army camped on both sides of the South Fork with Tarleton camped to the south, on or near the Gentzler farm. Foraging parties were sent in all directions to collect grain, and Ramsour's Mill was kept running day and night to turn the grain into flour. The Hessian troops, under the command of the British, enjoyed fraternizing with the local Germans, to the point that some of these mercenaries deserted their employer. By destroying his baggage in a dramatic night time bonfire, Cornwallis was sending a clear signal to his army that only hard fighting and marching lay ahead. On the morning of the 28th, the British broke camp and marched east 12 miles across Lincoln County towards Beattie's Ford. The Americans contest the fords on the Catawba, and it was the first of February before the British crashed across the Catawba at Cowen's Ford, and finaly left lincoln County. Cornwallis would fight a bloody draw at Gulford Courthouse, North Carolina in March. His heavy losses forced him to retreat to the coast, and thereby, effectivel abandon the Carolinas. By October, his army was bottled up at Yorktown, Virginia. unable to escape by sea, Cornwallis surrendered to George Washington's French and American army. Peace was at hand.
 

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Faye, that was wonderful! I don't have a direct RW ancestor, though there are some cousins who served. The story I have to relate is found in the pages of the booklet, "Reminiscences of George LaBar, the Centenarian of Monroe Co., PA, who is still living in his 107th year" by A.B. Burrell, 1870. George LaBar was my 4xgreat-grandfather.
Here is the excerpt in relation to the RW:
One day, George was with his father, not far from the house, splitting rails. A stranger, in citizen's dress, came to him, and told him he was a spy from the British army, and asked to stay with him all night. His father said he never turned anybody off who wanted a night's lodging. It was near night, and they went to the house. Soon after entering, the pretended British spy, looking out a crack of the door, said the Yankees were after him, and asked where he should go. The father said he could go upstairs. George's mother said, "No! get out the door and be off!". A moment more, and a half-a-dozen Yankee soldiers, in uniform, came in; the spy had played his game, and LaBar was pronounced a Tory. He was at once arrested, leg (he had previously broken a leg and now considered to have a "game leg", thus preventing him from duty) and all, and taken, that night, to Easton.
George's mother was greatly troubled that night, and he, to comfort her, told her he would follow him in the morning, and offer himself to take his father's place. But she knew his generous offer would not be accepted, nor would such a substitute afford her the desired relief.
Early the next morning, Mrs. LaBar set out, on horseback, for Easton, whither she supposed her husband had been taken. Arriving there, she found he had been bailed by Squire Levis and Abraham LaBar, a cousin, who soon after was a colonel in the Revolutionary army. She succeeded in proving the leg unfit for military duty, and the man was permitted to take it home again, to the joy of the woman and the satisfaction of the children, who had been left alone at home.
A short time after this, his horses were seized by an officer, and taken to Squire Depui's at Shawnee. He got his horses by swearing allegiance to the Government of the United States. Another horse was captured by one John Herring, who seems to have assumed his own authority for so doing. This horse was never returned, and never paid for. Free speech and a high-tempered disposition, with an inclination to retaliate, had the same effect now upon those who were heart and soul in sympathy with the rebel cause, to create enemies, just as the Indians were made so before. The senior George LaBar was called a Tory for these reasons.
Fire-arms were scarce in the Revolution, and a requisition was made, early in the war, for all such arms to be brought forward for the emergency. LaBar could spare one or two old shot-guns, but his own tried musket he kept for a long time, hid in a hollow tree in the woods. Was he to blame for this, when much of his meat had to be brought out of the woods?"
In Mr. Burrell's preface, he writes, " This little volume has been drawn together by frequent conversations with the aged pilgrim with whom those talks were had. His mind operates slowly, and in it's operation it often slides out of the channel upon which it first sets out, upon thoughts or topics suggested as he goes along." Mr. Burrell also states, "The historic part of this volume is, of course, fragmentary, touching here and there the early settlement of the Pennsylvania side of the river valley reaching from Easton to Bushkill."
The elder George was too old and crippled for the RW and the younger George was too young for the RW and too old for the War of 1812.
It's a wonderful little booklet that was sent to me by a cousin. Mr. Burrell did a wonderful job of telling the stories my 4xgreat-grandfather related to him (from memory at 107 y/o) and of the history of the settlement of the Delaware Gap area of PA. I just wanted to share that with you. Oh, and there is a statue in East Stroudsburg, PA, in his honor. He died in 1874 at the age of 111.
 

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Deb,

I enjoyed reading about George LaBar and his son. You had mention that Bill(ButlerFord45) had a Tillman line well in my line of Abernethy's the second Robert married a Christene Tillman daughter of Roger Tilghman(Tillman) and Susannah Parham.

This is how my Abernathy line goes:
Robert Abernethy and Sarah Cubbigge
Robert Abernethy and Christene Tillman
Robert Abernethy and Mary Howell
Robert Abernethy and Sarah Abernethy
Miles Abernethy and Ursula Bradshaw
Nathan Abernathy and Eve Cline
Isaiah Abernathy and Mary Jackson Faulkner
Susan Abernathy and John Tidwell
Franklin Isaiah Tidwell and Mattie Virginia Garrett
Ada Clementine Tidwell and Major McRay Warren
Edna Louise Warren and James Robert Fields
Sandra Faye Fields(me) and I married William(Bill)Shelby Graham,Jr

Faye
 

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Looking for any info on Gilbert Drew who served in Barnstable co.Masschusetts as a sergant,April 1732.
 
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