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Take a look at Lassen College. I've seen some of the students work at local guns shows...good stuff.

Lassen Community College
Gunsmithing Dept
P.O.Box 3000
Susanville CA 96130
530/251-8809
530/251-8800
email: [email protected]

I think they offer two year A.S. degree and voc tech certificates. I also think they have short courses in the summer. IMHO, that would be a great vacation getaway!
 

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Co. School of Trade for Gunsmith

I went through CST-G many years ago. Stronge hands on courses. I learned a lot. Went through basic hand tools, stock making and repair, welding, machining(lathe & mill work), hot blueing & polishing, basic blue print reading, design & function. Not all the work was done in shop, one day a week was designated for shooting.

I'ld recommend the school, of course that was over twenty years ago. You'ld have to check to see what is offered today.
 

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As a graduate of C.S.T. I too would have to recommend this School. Can't say that it is all that much better than Trinidad, but the rumor mill has it that it is far above whatever is in second place.
You will get all the "Hands On" you can stand. More if you ask for it. It is a great school and offers Lifetime Placement for Graduates.
Russ
 

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I went to CST also, learned alot! But you should take a close look att the yavapai school in AZ, met a guy who went there and in it souded real good! If I needed more training I'll go there!
 

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Second Lassen

LCC purchased all of the Gunsmithing tools and equipment from Oregon Institute of Technology, one of the best engineering schools on the west coast. Top notch equipment. good program. If I had the opportunity, I would be there.

Steve
 

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Anonymous said:
What does CST stand for?
CST Stands for; Colorado School of Trades, located in Lakewood Colorado. http://www.gunsmith-school.com/
They were established in 1947, and are definately one of the finest schools in the country. The course is 14 months long, and must be attended on site.
 

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Colorado School of Trades Alumni

I also graduated from the Colorado School of Trades Feb '83. I learned quite a bit, and a lot more since then. On their website, I now see that a "Lifetime Placement Program" has been instituted, along with horseshoeing of all things. When I graduated, they just waved bye. I visited the school back in November 1992 and they had moved into just one building, with about half of the students that I remembered. I guess that John T. Snyder and family must of sold it. Barnacle Bill
 

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You may want to check out Piedmont Community College in Roxboro, NC. They have an excellent program that is self paced and completely hands on. They offer both day and night classes. The length of the program for a full time day student is 2 years including both summers. Certificates, diplomas, and associate degrees are available. The gunsmithing part is the same for all 3. Diplomas require extra credits such as English or small business, etc. Degrees require even more. I have been attending part time for several years and will graduate in May 03. I highly recommend this school.
 

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When I search on Gunsmithing School about all that I find is CST. I know that many memebrs here recommend this school but what can those of us do who do not live in Colorado? I am in Hamilton, Ohio and was interested in learning gunsmithing. I am not aware of any local schools. How are the correspondence courses? What is the best route for me to go?

Thanks for any advice,
-Mike
 

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There is a list of "in residence" Gunsmithing schools on page 167 of the Brownells catalog. I can't recommend a correspondence school at all, there is just too much hands-on-with-instruction that needs to take place. I personally would recommend visiting as many of the 9 that I could before making a choice. It makes a big difference when you actually see a program at work as opposed to reading about it or just speaking to someone on the phone. I visited 6 of the 9 before I attended my choice and had eliminated the other 3 for obvious personal reasons. Start by requesting an information packet from each and spend some time reading and researching. All of the schools are online but one school is using a positioning technique which precludes you from seeing the whole list in the synopsis of a search engine. If you need the list, I will be happy to type it out and send it to you.

Best.
 

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I also looked into the gunsmithing trade as a nice retirement job. I posted on the old forum and the school in Colorado and in North Carolina came highly recommended. I agree that you need to be a "resident student" as there is a lot of hands on training required. One thing that was said in the earlier post was that you better be prepared to be watched and sometimes hassled by the Govt. Someone said the BATF would just walk in and audit all your records and look at all the work you had in progress. A couple of guys said they got tired of it and took down the "shingle" and just worked out of their home on a more informal basis. I can't say yea or nah to this as I really don't know. The advice given me was if you really like the work go for it but be prepared for the hassle that can come with it. I would be interested in hearing others opinions on this part of gunsmithing :-D
 
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