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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Colt style revolver with a VERY creepy trigger. I'd like to reduce the creep. Looking at the innards I can see that if I file away the outer part of the notch in on the hammer to say, half what it is now, I would reduce the creep by half. Of course, I then have half the engagement. If I carry this to the point of very little creep I might have an unsafe trigger. I am wondering just what role the angle of the mating surfaces will play. Any thoughts on this?
 

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Can't think of any safety reason for the sear engagment notch on the hammer to be more than the thickness of the sear.

Would suggest (1) not to touch the actual engagment surface while you reduce (2) use a stone to polish your work smooth.

MAY be a problem...if the sear doesn't pivot as much outward, may find that the 1/2 cock notch catches the sear...o5r almost catches it and batters the snot out of it.

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One alternative I've tried is to limit the sear's engagment by building up the BACK of the sear..so it moves engagement to the front of the hammer's notch. Can be reversable as a test by simply gluing a shim to the back of the sear. Find just the right amount, and then either (1) add a limiting pin to the hammer and stone it down to get that same amount of engagment (2) do the same thing by adding a shim. OF the two, like the pin method as it's easier and doesn't overheat any critical part plus it doesn't change the relationship fo the sear to the 1/2 cock notch
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As a general rule, will try to work on the cheapest/easiest to replace part....take your pick, hammer notch stoned down or dirllied for a pin... trigger sear built up.
 

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have done some fairley decent trigger work by useing a center punch and throwing up a burr on the hammer on the full cock notch then stoneing it down to get what i want know this sounds like a bad idea but it works. this was elmer keiths favorite way of tuneing the trigger on some of his personal colts and if it was acceptable for elmer then it fine for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Colt trigger

At present the sear and the notch both have the same width. If I reduce either the width or the engagement by say 50% the creep would be reduced by 50%. Carrying this to its logical extreme would leave me with next to no creep and next to no engagement. Doesn't strike me as safe by the time I have the creep down to a reasonable level. That's why I'm wondering what is the role played by the angle of the mating surfaces?

This is the sort of thing you want to have well thought out before you get the stone out.
 

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Well..if they are angled "up" then the trigger is always hard to pull as it would have to roll the hammer back against a fully compressed mainspring (watcht eh hammer carefully wehn pulling the trigger...see if it coems back a bit as the trigger is pulled)....if angled "down" then would tend to slip off all by itself. Smoothness is an issue with pull, rough mating surfaces let you feel the creep...smooth surfaces still creep, but you don't notice it as much.

Chances are that the full thickenss of the sear isn't making contact with that notch...cycle it a few dozen times and take a look for the bright contact marks...will praobly find (1) about 1/2 the sear is actually touching and (2) it isn't touching evenly.
 

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CREEP

I you look at a brand new never used Colt SA trigger, you will see that the sear nose is angled downward at the rear, this reduces the engagement with the hammer notch by the thickness of the sear itself, and has decidedly less creep. Playing with that angle and a mini chamfer on the sear's rear edge is the way one adjusts creep and pull.
 
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