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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the F.A.Q or Handi Basics it talks about pulling the trigger completely through or all the way back. Is this done to prevent light primer hits only? Or is does it have something to do with improving accuracy? If it improves accuracy, please explain how/why. Im also a NOOB, so if you start throwing out terms like "transfer bars" I won't be able to grasp the concept. By the way whats a transfer bar?
 

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czvz

If you pull the hammer back you will see a small plate that comes up between the hammer and the firing pin , this is the transfer bar , when the hammer hits it and then it hits the firing pin the round is fired .

The trigger must be pulled all the way through to insure that the transfer bar stays in the proper possion when firing , if not you will get erratic primer hits and accuracy will be affected .

Hope this helps .

stimpy
 

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Stimpy is correct. I also thinks it helps being consistent. If you pull the trigger the same each time, you get the same results. ;) Same in; same out.
 

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CZVZ, ever play billiards (pool)? The firing mechanics of a gun with a transfer bar safety system can be likened to putting the 5 ball in the side pocket in billiards. Think of the hammer as the cue stick, the transfer bar as the cue ball, and the 5 ball as the bullet primer. The cue stick (hammer) strikes the cue ball (transfer bar) which transfers it's energy to the 5 ball (bullet primer) your trying to sink.
If you don't hit the cue ball in just the right place with the right amount of force with the cue stick what generally happens to your shot?

Making sure you follow threw on the trigger of a Handi Rifle helps ensure your transfer bar is lined up properly and receives a solid hit from the hammer.
 

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Here's a illustration showing the transfer bar operation as described by the previous posters.

This can be found with more detailed info in the FAQ's or at the H&R 1871 website.

Bill
 

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czvz,
The "transfer bar" is not an obscure concept. It is a thing that you can easily see. Watch the hammer as you slowly cock it (pull it back). As you do so, you will see a small bar of metal come up and forward between the hammer and firing pin, and come to rest on the back end of the firing pin. This small metal bar is the transfer bar. Furthermore, look at the hammer, and you will notice that it is notched, so that it is impossible for the hammer itself to come in contact with the firing pin. Your gun will not fire without the transfer bar. The transfer bar falls away after you pull the trigger. If you lightly pull and release the trigger before the hammer has had time to fall, the transfer bar may fall out of position prematurely, causing a weak (or failed) firing pin strike.

The transfer bar is an invention of the modern corporate lawyers, and is supposedly put there to make the gun safer (prevent accidental discharges). I'm not sure how it accomplishes this, as my bar seems to come into place even before I pull my trigger. I am told that old-timers despise the transfer bar because of the affect that it has on trigger pull. I've never shot a pre-transfer bar gun, so I can't tell you what the difference is.
Duane
 

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The purpose of the transfer bar is to prevent accidental discharges it prevents the hammer from striking the firing pin if the trigger isn't pulled, like if the firearm was dropped or fell over, or someone was lowering the hammer after choosing not to shoot, as long as the trigger isn't pulled all the way to the rear, the hammer can't hit the firing pin, there's no direct contact between hammer and firing pin.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
O.K. ..... I get the operation of transfer bar now, but ..... I still don't see how pulling the trigger completely through will affect accuracy. Assuming the primer ignites, if the transfer bar is lightly struck or struck hard? I shot the Handi I have with 5 different flavors of ammo before I read about pulling completely through... never had a misfire. So, wouldnt it be better, assuming no misfires, that one would only pull the trigger enough for the hammer to fall, thus less vibration, wander, and stress during the lockup time?
 

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That would be true if there were no transfer bar, but inconsistent pin strikes will result in inconsistent accuracy, that's a fact born out many times over, once newbies learn how to shoot with one, they're on the road to happy shooting. ;)

Tim
 

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The reason you must pull the trigger all the way to the rear is to ensure the transfer bar is held up to it's highest position consistently...and the key to accuracy is consistency ...Everything from your ammo...to how you mount the rifle to your shoulder..to how you squeeze the trigger...the more consistent you are...the better the chance for excellent accuracy...baring any mechanical problems with the scope or rifle or issues with your ammo...With the Handi rifles...this matters greatly...Too light a trigger pull with them...causes folks to stop at the trigger break...and is one of the main reasons for shot to shot variation...Hence...you must ensure you are pulling the trigger as far back each and every time...This is one of the hardest thing for guys shooting bolt guns with tuned triggers to do when they first start shooting the Handi rifles...A light trigger pull is ok for those who understand this and have ingrained it into their shooting habits...but will cause fits to those who haven't...Unexpected fliers in groups if not the cause of the ammo or malfunction of the scope on a mechanically sound Handi ...is usually caused by this.

Mac
 
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