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Recently moved to Massachusetts, so I can't hunt deer with a rifle. Thinking of buying an Ultra Slug Hunter. I haven't shot in years. I developed a little bit of a flinch, but I want to practice a lot to get over it. Thinking the 20 gauge makes more sense than the 12 with regards to recoil. Will the 20 be sufficient to kill whitetails out to about 125 yards, if needed? I test fired (snap cap) a USH the other day, and the trigger pull was VERY heavy. Any way to remedy this? Thanks for all your help.
 

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Brad, not sure about effective lethal range of a 20 gauge slugger but I bet it would be dandy for the recoil sensitive.

For more info on effective range, hit the search button near the top of the page and enter 20 gauge ultra slug hunter. Specify Nef/H&R shotgun forums and sit back and enjoy the read. Lots of info and discussions of scopes and ranges and might even find a hunting dtory in there.

Welcome to GBO.

Nixter
 

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BradCoPAHunter said:
Recently moved to Massachusetts, so I can't hunt deer with a rifle. Thinking of buying an Ultra Slug Hunter. I haven't shot in years. I developed a little bit of a flinch, but I want to practice a lot to get over it. Thinking the 20 gauge makes more sense than the 12 with regards to recoil. Will the 20 be sufficient to kill whitetails out to about 125 yards, if needed? I test fired (snap cap) a USH the other day, and the trigger pull was VERY heavy. Any way to remedy this? Thanks for all your help.
Welcome Aboard :D

You can do a-little research here by using the search feature at the top of the page...and over on the NEF centerfire forum in the FAQ's sticky... there you'll find a link to Perklo's site...were he gives good details on the trigger issue...FWIW...either USH will work to 125yards with the right ammo provided you can shoot that good.....and I would work on curing any flinch you have with some standard shotshell loads prior to starting any bench work with slugs...there is a-lot more recoil with the slugs...

Good Luck...

Mac
 

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What kind of hunting will you be doing? will you be sitting in a stand or walking around a lot? If you're going to spend the day on your feet and carrying the gun I'd get a 20ga Tracker 2.Mac's advice about the FAQs, search and perklo's trigger job instructions are spot on. Welcome to the board.
 

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I cannot address the 12 gauge ush ,however i've had a 20gauge ush for many years and it is certainly adequate out 125yds with proper sabots and scope
2-3inch groups in my case. the only drawback I can see is the weight if you do alot of walking, I addressed that somewhat by getting the youth
model which had an added bonus of easier shoulder mounting when wearing bulky clothes which is a given here in Ohio.GL
 

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Discussion Starter #6
20 gauge is looking better

Thanks for the feedback, folks. I shouldered the 12 gauge and, while heavy, it felt so well balanced that it didn't feel as heavy as it really is. I also liked that the weight made if very steady to hold offhand. I haven't found the trigger job info yet, but I'll look. I hadn't considered the youth model because the regular fit well. But you have a good point that the fit changes when wearing heavy clothes. Something to think about.

A couple of other questions. I noticed that the hammer only had a single cocked position--ready to fire. I was surprised that it didn't have a half-cock position for safety. Actually, I don't recall what type of safety the USH has. Where is it located, and how does it operate?
 

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Here's Perklo's web page for the trigger jobs..http://www.perkloafm.com/

The safety on the USH hunter won't be found anywhere on the gun...it's between your ears...in otherwords...don't cock the trigger till your ready to fire :) :-D :)

Good Luck

Mac
 

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Brad,

Mac is right about the real safety, however there is a safety feature built into current production guns that is better known as the "transfer bar". This transfer bar only moves into a position to strike the firing pin when the gun is cocked and will remain up to strike the firing pin when the trigger is pulled and held back. If you cock the hammer it's ready. If you want to let the hammer down without firing, (MAKE SURE THE MUZZLE IS POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION) plant your thumb firmly on the hammer spur holding it back then depress the trigger momentarily only enough to allow the hammer under your thumb to start traveling forward slightly, then release the trigger and slowly allow the hammer to return to the uncocked forward position. The transfer bar will move down and out of the way of the firing pin as long as you are no longer holding the trigger and if it is working as it is supposed to be. If you were to be cocking your gun and your thumb happened to slip off the hammer half way back a gun without the transfer bar would likely be accidentially discharged by you, with the transfer bar it would not provided it is working as it should because the transfer bar would move down out of the way as the hammer is falling provided your finger is NOT on the trigger. This feature also prevents a bumped hammer from the rear from striking the firing pin since the transfer bar is down and out of the way. The H&R/NEF guns do not have a hammer block safety or trigger block safety. All my transfer bars work as they should and is one of the first things I test when I pick up one of these guns after making sure the gun is unloaded and pointed in a safe direction.

The transfer bar is also used in late model Ruger revolvers if you are more familiar with those.

The best safety when using any gun is as Mac says, right between your ears. I think they are one of the safest guns out there, either they are cocked or uncocked with no mechanical safety to fail.

Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
USH safety

Thanks for the info on the safety features of the USH. The only gun I owned or used that had an external hammer was a Winchester model 94. It had a half-cocked position for safety, and you had to hold the lever up (to depress some button, I don't know the technical name) or you couldn't fire. I always thought it was unsafe to leave the hammer down on a gun with a loaded chamber. Looks like I learned something new. Thanks.
 
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