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(I posted this on the NEF/H&R forum, but wanted to see if I could get any other feedback here.)

Recently moved to Massachusetts, so I can't hunt deer with a rifle. Thinking of buying an Ultra Slug Hunter. I haven't shot in years. I developed a little bit of a flinch, but I want to practice a lot to get over it. Thinking the 20 gauge makes more sense than the 12 with regards to recoil. Will the 20 be sufficient to kill whitetails out to about 125 yards, if needed? I test fired (snap cap) a USH the other day, and the trigger pull was VERY heavy. Any way to remedy this? Thanks for all your help.
 

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the 20 ga. is PLENTY for white tails, boar and black bear out to 175 yds. yes 175 yds. a reminginton cor lokt 20 ga 260. gr slug has 1300 ft/lbs out to 200 yds. the minimum for deer has always been 1000 ft/lbs. the 12 ga. kicks harder and uses alot of unneeded power for deer. if you have a mocho thing, go w/ the 12. if you want great accuracy go w/ the 20. i have shot group w/ my ush 20- 3/4" at 100 yds- 4" 150 yds- 5" at 175. i would never take a shot this long without a good rest and a dead calm day but if this is all there, the gun is VERY capable. the choice betwen a 20 ga. or 12 ga. for deer is like a .458 win or a .270 for deer. if you buy this gun, you won't be sorry!!! go to the h&r/nef page on this web site~~~lots of info there!!!
 

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I had a 20 gauge 3 years ago but what happen was that I could not buy certain things for my gun like, a special turkey choke, scope mount,. I would buy a 12 gauge shotgun because they are popular 20 gauges are not, nothing against 20 gauge shotguns. I would prefer a 12 gauge because of popularity.

Hoped I helped Buckshooter
 

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I bought my son the 20ga Ultra Slug Hunter Youth last year and he has taken 4 deer with it the closest was 25 yards and the farthest was 128 yards he shoots winchester partition golds out if it that's what it likes the best of what we have tried its topped with a 3-9x40 scope and I bought him a harris bipod this year for it and he realy likes it
 

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I chose the 20US 5 years ago. You need to look at that 12US before you decide - the barrel looks like a truck axle and the gun is *heavy*. My 20us with a Burris 1.75x5 weights 9.5lbs, which is obviously still no light weight. The 20 has proven very effective on whitetails. I have shot 5 animals and all dropped very quickly. The new federal barnes tipped expander is the most impressive load I have used. 1900fps with a 275gr slug. I have been getting excellent accuracy and the one buck I shot with the load dropped very quickly with a massive blood trail - a complete pass through. I chose the 20ga because of the weight, but i have found the performance to be a pleasant surprise.
 

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I have a Thompson-Center TCR-87 with a 20-ga rifled barrel. My records show that over the past few years I've gotten 38 deer with it, mostly does. Of those, 11 were at ranges of 150 yards or further. The furthest was slightly past 200 yards, and at longer ranges almost all were measured with a laser rangefinder. I shot 2 deer with big lead slugs in brass cases but the rest were with Winchester and Hornaday sabot loads. For broadside shots through the chest I don't think there is any advantage of using a 12-ga. Typically the deer run 50 yards after being hit. However, two fairly large bodied bucks went about 200 yards. One of those was not hit through both lungs. On only one shot did the sabot slug not shoot through the deer. That deer was a small one directly facing me at about 50 yards. The slug entered the front of the chest and was found under the hide a couple inches from the rear vent. For a large buck running directly away, I am not sure one could shoot it in the butt with a 20-ga sabot slug and be sure the slug would get to the vital areas of the chest cavity with enough remaining velocity to do much damage. Anyway, if one plans to shoot deer running away, maybe a 12-ga with heavier slugs would be a better choice. I think the lower recoil of the 20-ga is an advantage as 12-ga guns with slugs often recoil terribly. I've had to shoot from some awkward positions and it was nice to not have to worry so much about possibly being cut by the scope, and I am not particularly recoil sensitive. My long range set-up for deer during the rifle season is a .338-.378 Weatherby without a recoil brake. Around here it is more difficult to find the good 20-ga slugs. The gas station/quick shops usually only carry the old fashioned 12-ga slugs and not all the gun shops have a complete selection of sabot 20-ga slugs. I make sure I have enough before season begins.
 
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