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I am new to this forum. I read somewhere that the vent should be drilled and tapped on cannons with liners. Then a bolt (brass, bronze?) inserterd and drilled for the proper fuse size. The advantages are a continuous surface from the liner thru the casting. I also assume you could have different bolts for different fuse size.

What I didn't do was save the link to my favorites so I could get it later. Any advice as far as what size bolt, material, etc is appreciated.
 

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Spaz -

Welcome to the board!

Good question. Keep 'em coming.

I would ASSUME that the diameter of the bolt should be enough to allow strength - too close to the threads and you'll have a broken bolt.

The purpose, obviously, is to keep the products of combustion away from the junction of the liner and the tube; hence a tight fit is good.

Past that, since I have no cannons with liners yet, I'll let those with experience speak.
 

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thanks for the info...do you have a stolen cannon page?

Thanks for your advice and this website. You do us all a great service. I am fairly new in artillery. I just upgraded an 1841 2/3 scale 6 ponder to a full size. The reason for the increase was due to a theft of my old one. I don't know how they managed to get it from an elaborate locking security system, but never underestimate the abilities of a thief. You can see my old gun. No real distinguishing features that couldn't be removed, some gold trim leaf and the carriage. I did have the vent tapped, not for a drilled out bolt, but for an eyebolt that was part of the lock up. (I turned the cannon upside down when I wasn't firing it and used the eyebolt). They may have cut thru the bolt when they stole it, leaving a steel bolt in it.

Anyway, I am taking my new project slowly and reading as much on safety as I can. I am building a naval carriage, which although may not be historically accurate for my gun, is easier to build and sturdier. How do most modern artilleryman view mis-matched cannon/carriages? I am sure the diehard re-enactors would chuckle, but hopefully not the entire lot of them. Thanks again for the post.
 

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How do most modern artilleryman view mis-matched cannon/carriages?
I should imagine it would mostly depend on whether or not their particular cannon is a "historical" reproduction. Mine is certainly not a reproduction of anything that ever existed.... it goes bang though launching pound and a half zinc balls downrange with a good bit of zip. More than enough to keep me happy.

 

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Re: thanks for the info...do you have a stolen cannon page?

spaz said:
.... How do most modern artilleryman view mis-matched cannon/carriages? ....
My perspective is reflected in the brass plack that I put up by the front door when our neighborhood was declaired to be the histerical district: "On this site in 1894, nothing happened."

And then, there are quite a few folks that go so far to dress in period blue and gray uniforms to go shooting!

Each has his own, both are OK. Choose your pick.
 
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