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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got the receipe for Felix lube; was wondering if there are others that do the same job. Now going to be shooting smokeless (yes, I know this is the BP forum but you pards know the real answers to questions).
This for a .45LC round (200 gr one at that)
thanks
 

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Ranger; yer gonna go a long ways to beat "felix's wonderfully fabulous lube" (FWFL). That stuff will let ya shoot high velocity lead and stay clean. Also, this is a black powder forum; but black powder lubes are also good for the heathern smokieless at or below 1500 fps or a bit more maybe, which I certainly hope your .45 Colt loads will not exceed! You may find those 200 gr bullets to not be liked by the Colt as much as the 250+ ones and if ya get forcing cone leading your best lube may be Lee tumble stink. I load 250 gr heathern ammo for son No Hat Nat and use either PRS lube or Lee tumble stink. Both are great. BTW; felix was very helpful to me in learing how to formulate lubes, there is a lot in common with FWFL and PRS lube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, Felix it is; now what is a good batch size? 1#, 10#, 6 oz? Don't want to have to be cooking castor oil every week or so :grin:
 

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The uninformed (ME!) want to know what is in FWFL's Lube, always looking for some new and improved :grin: ..

thanks,
1860
 

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My own patch, felt wad and bullet lubricant for black powder is a 19th century recipe, found in a 1943 issue of the American Rifleman. It was originally a factory recipe used to lubricate heeled bullets, such as .22 rimfire and .32, .38 and .41 Long Colt, in factory loads with black powder.
The recipe is:
1 part paraffin (I use canning paraffin, found in grocery stores)
1 part mutton tallow (sold by Dixie Gun Works)
1/2 part beeswax (available at hobby and hardware stores)
All measures are by weight, not volume. I use a kitchen scale to measure 200 grams of paraffin, 200 grams of mutton tallow and 100 grams of beeswax. This nearly fills a quart Mason jar.
Place the Mason jar in a pot or coffee can with about 4 inches of boiling water. This gives a double-boiler effect, which is the safest way to melt waxes and greases.
When the ingredients in the jar are thoroughly melted, stir well with a clean stick or a disposable chopstick. Remove from water and allow to cool at room temperature (trying to speed cooling by placing in the refrigerator may cause the ingredients to separate).
This creates a lubricant nearly identical to a well-known black powder lubricant sold commercially.
Some sharp-eyed shooters will note that paraffin is a petroleum product, and such products are pure poison when mixed with black powder. Though many older black powder manuals may recommend using automotive grease and such, knowledgeable shooters avoid it.
Mixing black powder with petroleum products causes a hard, tarry fouling that is difficult to remove and clogs the rifling, affecting accuracy.
Yet, paraffin doesn't seem to do this. In a separate post, a chemist explained that paraffin lacks the hydrocarbons of other petroleum products. Apparently, these hydrocarbons are the offender.
All I know is that the above lubricant works very well with black powder, despite its paraffin ingredient. I believe the paraffin is essential; it increases the lubricant's melting point and adds stiffness to felt wads and cloth patches, which helps scrape out fouling.
To lubricate felt wads, such as those used in cap and ball revolvers, or muzzleloading rifle patches, place a small amount of the lubricant in a clean tuna or cat food can.
Melt on a burner at a very low heat. You don't need to fry the lubricant, just melt it.
Drop your revolver wads or patches into the can and stir them around with a clean stick until all wads or patches are saturated. Allow to cool at room temperature; hastening cooling by placing in the refrigerator may cause the ingredients to separate.
After cool, snap a plastic lid (available in the pet food aisle) over the can and store in a cool, dry place. This keeps dust and crud out and retains the lubricant's natural moistness.
I don't bother to squeeze out the excess lubricant from patches or wads but use them as-is.
This is an excellent bullet lubricant for all black powder uses. I also use it to lubricate cast bullets for my .44-40 and .45-70 rifles. I've tried it with .357 Magnum bullets at up to 1,200 feet per second and it prevents leading. I haven't tried it at a higher velocity in the .357 or other calibers, but may someday.
I've used the Ox-Yoke felt Wonder Wads in the past and their dry lubricant is okay, but in my experience the wads lack enough lubricant to keep fouling soft on long-barreled revolvers or rifles.
In cap and ball revolvers, seat the wad firmly on the powder first, then seat the ball. This way, should you forget to charge a chamber with powder, it's easier to remove a felt wad than it is a lead ball.
In the muzzleloading rifle, seat the wad firmly on the powder first, then follow it with a patched round ball. Wads such as these don't work well with hollow-based bullets such as the traditional Minie'. The wad interferes with the gases expanding the bullet's skirt to engage the rifling.
In my .45-70, I seat a well-lubricated wad firmly on the black powder, then seat the bullet. This requires a slight reduction in powder to compensate for the wad's volume but it sure makes for some clean shooting.
This old-time lubricant recipe is a good one. It's inexpensive, versatile and rivals any commercially made lubricant made for black powder. It's about all I use anymore.
 

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:D HI All.
I found a receipt for lube they used in the Sharps Rifle in a copy of a Sharps rifle manual. It calls for a 50/50 mix of bees wax and sperm wale oil.I found out Dixie gun works has a synthetic sperm oil so I sent for two bottles of it and mixed some up.I tested some today and so far my 30"barrel likes it.I can push a dry rag through it and it is moist,and takes 90 % of the fouling out with one dry patch.I wonder how it will perform when it gets hot and dry?
 

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I wont use paraffin regardless period. I don't care what was written in 1943 issue of the American Rifleman. Who was it written by and how much experiance does he have with black powder cartridge loading, maybe just enough for the artical?

Paraffin is a NO NO with black powder cartridge loading, and those that have used it in their long guns have gotten worse fouling as a result of paraffin use.

For winter shooting because of the colder temps I use a 50/50 mix.

8 oz. Beeswax
8 oz. Neetsfoot Oil

Mixed well together using a double boiler and then set my bullets in for pan lubing. Let stand until firm and then punch out the bullets.

For spring/summer shooting.

8 oz. Beeswax
4 oz. Neetsfoot Oil
4 oz. Coconut Oil bar
 

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Montanan:

How does that mix work out in your summer climate with the 2.4?
This Sharps receipt showes a lot of promis.I mixed up a small batch.The 50-50 mix is a little soft but it stayes in the groove,and it's slicker than snail slime :)
I'm heading out to Big Timber tuesday to make my final decision on the #1.I think there cutting the barrel for it now, so production should be starting soon on mine.And order another #1. Haven't made up my mind on the caliber yet,Kinda leaning on the 50-90 or a 45-2.6 dont know yet.Lp.
 

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Well, Montanan ... the article "Bullet Lubrication" was written by R. C. Skaggs in the February, 1943 issue of the American Rifleman.
I don't know anything about Mr. Skaggs, but it's obvious from his article that he is (or was) well-versed in the properties of various waxes, greases and oils, as such knowledge stood in 1943.
Skaggs doesn't mention using black powder in his article. The recipe he offers is a factory recipe, provided him by someone else, used for heeled, outside-lubricated bullets such as the .22 rimfires and .32, 38 and .41 Long Colt centerfire cartridges.
I use the lubricant I listed above in my reproduction 1873 Trapdoor carbine (20" barrel) .45-70 with Goex FFG and a 425 gr. lead bullet. It's never caused any fouling problems.
I also use it in my .44-40 rifle with 24 inch barrel.
Therefore, I can't conclude as you did that, "Paraffin is a NO NO with black powder cartridge loading ..."
I know that using paraffin is contrary to every published article out there.
I'm just as suspect of today's articles as you are about one published 60 years ago.
How many years did we see the advice to use automotive grease over the ball of black powder revolvers? And some sources STILL say automotive grease may be used with cap and ball revolvers.
We know today, from experience, that such petroleum greases cause a hard, tarry fouling when used with black powder.
As I noted in my earlier post, ". . . paraffin doesn't seem to do this. In a separate post, a chemist explained that paraffin lacks the hydrocarbons of other petroleum products. Apparently, these hydrocarbons are the offender.
"All I know is that the above lubricant works very well with black powder, despite its paraffin ingredient."
I can't explain it. I'm no chemist.
All I know is that it works. Interestingly, it bears a very close resemblance to the commercially manufactured SPG Bullet Lubricant. I wonder if SPG contains paraffin?
But I'll give you the benefit of experience, if you'll grant me the same.
One factor may account for the disparity between your view and my experience: the amount of powder used.
Perhaps in my short-barreled .45-70, even with 60 grains of FFG, there simply isn't enough black powder and barrel length to create the gremlins you've seen.
Yet, I've fired my .45-70 up to 100 times on a hot, Utah desert day without a buildup of hard, caked fouling. In fact, there's been the tell-tale star-shaped ring of lubricant at the muzzle.
In my .44-40, with up to 40 grains of FFFG (old, balloon-head cases) and a 217 gr. lead bullet, there may not be enough black powder to create the problem. The same may be said of the cap and ball pistols I use.
Perhaps if I shot a .45-100 with a bullet weighing 500 grains or more, with 90-100 grains of FFG black powder, I'd see a problem with paraffin.
All I can say is that in my firearms the above bullet lubricant works.
It's difficult to argue with success.
 
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