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I was once asked if I knew for sure people carried extra cylinders for their C&B revolvers. I didn't. :-\


I got the impression this member didn't believe people carried spare cylinders. In truth I had never seen anything to indicate it was done, other then a Clint Eastwood movie that is.


Well, I found these pics today!
 

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This is the note for the pictures.


An absolutely fantastic Texas rig owned and carried by a Confederate officer "Col. F.S. Bass". He enlisted as a Captain and rose to the rank of Colonel in the 1st Texas Infantry(Hoods Brigade). When the Civil War broke out there were many U.S Troops stationed on the Texas Frontier and many of them enlisted in the Confederacy and took their U.S issued arms with them. Also many Federal troops were captured and disarmed with the Confederate soldiers taking their weapons. We can be sure that Col. Bass acquired this '51 U.S Colt in one of these ways. This pistol is in really fine shape for a Confederate pistol. It retain a good amount of it's original blue finish and case colors. The cyl. still has most of it's scene visible and the action is crisp. Col. Bass had a rear sight installed on the barrel. The bore is also very good. The really best part of all is the Rig with it's Texas buckle. It consists of a '51 navy form fitting holster, a box to carry 2 spare cylinders, cartridge box and Bowie Knife. This is without a doubt the most complete and best Confederate outfit available today. When I originally acquired it I didn't know there was a name on the inside curve of the trigger guard as it's really tough to see under all the patina and grime. It was only after careful examination that I was able to discern a name.
 

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that's very interesting !.. i feel like i have questions, maybe im just dumbfounded ..either way, im not sure how to form my questions.

that cylinder box, ive seen boxes carried like that before, but is that what they were originally intended for ??
 

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Somewhere in Elmer Keith's writings he mentions Civil War(War of Northern Aggression for some of my friends!) soldiers carrying extra loaded cylinders, but offers no particulars. The prevailing opinion is that this rarely if ever happened. This picture does offer some evidence to the contrary. I keep in mind that Keith was taught to shoot by a couple of veterans from the War, one from each side. It still makes for an interesting debate.
 

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In the chapter on cap&ball revolvers in his book "Sixguns",Keith talked about spare cylinders.In several other parts of the book as well.I have always carried spare cylinders,for my 1860 army,Dragoon,and my Ruger,and Remingtons.
 

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.


IME, as a general rule, soldiers usually have a LOT to carry, and (except for occifers) would most likely not carry the extra cylinder.

OTOH, I would think that a gunslinger (I wonder just how they supported themselves, except for robberies) that used Remingtons would.


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This is such an informative thread...I enjoyed your post and your support material. 8)
 

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Spare cylinders were mainly a southern gurrella thing.The James brothers,Bloody Bill Anderson,and the Youngers carried many revolvers and spare cylinders.These fighters used horses to carry the extra weight.Read Sixguns to get accurate info.on this.It is the best source of percussion revolver info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
sub-sonic said:
Read Sixguns to get accurate info.on this.It is the best source of percussion revolver info.

By Keith? ??? I've got it, just haven't read it yet... :-[
 

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I agree Keith's books had a lot of info in them.

I also agree that mounted troops used handguns and Sabres much more than infantry. The infantry may have had a last ditch weapon but it was probable his banoyte. Most were poor boys and we're lucky to have shoes much less a colt navy.

The mounted gorilla troops were little more than outlaw groups fighting for a cause. But probably had a much greater chance to pick up additional weapons along with their foraging.
 

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I carry them caps up,Dixie gun works and several others carry cylinder pouches.I use nipples that are a tight fit with my caps,I also pinch them before seating.After all are in place I cock the hammer,and lower it on the capped nipples,then press firmly.I do this for all 6 capped nipples.I also seal the capped nipples with primer sealant or clear nail polish for wet weather.Loaded like this the loads are fresh,even after years.Black powder does not soak up moisture like the substutes.As a serious black powder shooter,I need relibality.Black powder can keep for more than 100years properly stored.Cant do that with smokeless.
 

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Do you seal the inside of the cap or over the cap and nipple gluing it on? The lube keeps the cylinder face sealed will this keep moisture out of the back. I saw little O rings for caps. Would think they would push the cap back off over time.
 

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Heard of an account where a trunk was opened that contained grandmas 1851 navy night stand gun, the trunk it self had not been opened for 100 years, the caps had been weatherproofed with wax dripped on them with a candle. Powder was still viable after the chambers were emptied the powder was ignited, then the caps were each fired successfully.
perhaps a small drip of wax on the side of the nipple would be a sort of sealant as the cap was pressed on.
Great tip on the nail polish and pressing them home for dependability.
 
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