Graybeard Outdoors banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to get my 44 dialed in this week, and wondered what distance you guys "sight in" at with hunting handguns using iron sights? Any advice from you guys shooting unscoped revolvers would be appreciated. My particular revolver is a S&W 29-2 with the 6 1/2" barrel, and I will probably be hunting from creek-bottom stands where shots are less than 50 yards.
I was thinking about getting it on at 20-25 yards, then shooting at 50 and see how close it is... resting on sandbags from the bench.
Thoughts?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,655 Posts
With iron sights, I usually sight in hunting loads (240 grain at about 1250 - 1300 fps) at 50 yards. Less than an inch high at 25 yards, and about 5 inches low at 100. I don't usually shoot past 100 with iron sights with a handgun. I will sometimes use a 100 yard zero when using an optic equipped revolver, as the grouping at closer ranges is only a couple inches high, or less, and it extends your range a little if you underestimate the range to your target. Even with an optic, I still like to keep it inside 100 yards when deer hunting.

Sighting about an inch high at 25 yards should put you pretty close at 50. Be careful with your bench technique though. Often times a heavy recoiling handgun fired from the bench will not group the same as hand held off hand. When benching, and trying to simulate off hand, I like to rest my forearms on sandbags, with the gun held in my two hands, not touching anything. Not as steady as resting the gun on the bags, but it more closely simulates the recoil and grouping of off hand firing. In hunting situations, I usually use a sitting position, with my arms braced on my knees, or rest my shooting arm against a tree for support if standing. Keeping 5 out of 6 from a field position on a paper plate is my standard when deciding on how far I will shoot with a particular gun.

Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
I have my 5.5" Ruger SBH sighted in at 75 yds, which puts me 1 1/4" high at 25 yards, 2" high at 50yds, dead on at 75yds, and 2 1/2 low at 100 yds. I am using a 250gr cast bullet at right at 1200fps. This gives me a load I can use and hold dead on a deer or hog out to 100 yds, even though I do my best to limit shots to 50 yds and usually much less if at all possible. But it is nice to be able to shoot to 100 yds if needed for a second shot, even though I shoot for the shoulder blade to minimize tracking due to the thick brush I hunt hogs in. I am still working on my .44 Contender, so not sure what my final zero will be with it, but expecting to find this same kind of set up to be most practical.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
24,004 Posts
I sight them in to be dead on at the longest range I will shoot game. I look at it like this. When the shot is at what I consider the far side of what I will shoot I want the gun as precise as possible and don't want to worry about hold over. Used to be dead on at a 100 yards then it regressed to 75 and these days with my old eyes 50 yards is about the farthest I will shoot a open sighted handgun. If you were talking scopes id say a 100 but I haven't used a scoped handgun in 20 years. Not to be critical but if you have to ask you probably don't have any business shooting game farther then 50 yards anyway. Any further then that and you need to have shot enough to be so familiar with your gun and load that youd know where it hit at any range and know the hold over you needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
900 Posts
I have mine sighted at 50 for the load I am using. Notice that everybody has sighted with a specific load. change anything about it and it may hit in a drastically different place. One other thing that would be good for you if you have not done a great deal of big bore revolver hunting is to go get one of those life size paper deer targets and practice on that. It will give you a realistic perspective of what that deer looks like in your sights at 50 or 75 yards and you are not just shooting at a target dot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
Depends on the rest in your stand. Most of my handgun practice has been done with defense in mind. Standing, unsupported at 25 or 30 yards. Often double action with some speed in mind. I figure this is a good range to practice for charging pigs, bears, wolves, or cats.
If I knew I would be sniping from a stand with a good rest, I'd do a lot of practicing in single action from a similarly rested position at 50 yards for starters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
I carry a 7 abnd a half inch ruger Blackhawk bisley with irons, when I can find it, my go2 deer load is American eagle 240 grain JHP. Lucky me they are dead on at 100 yards with the sight bottomed out. Lol. I practice at that distance a lot and am very confident, the last buck I killed with it I still hunted to. Within 40.feet of and shot him in his sleep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
I think distance is going to depend on your ability and the area you are going to hunt.
50 yards is a good start, if you can shoot a pi plate at 50 yards, move back, if you can't hit a pie plate move up till you can and look at distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
I agree duck, in the 80's I shot a lot of handgun sillouhette and would have not hesitated to take a poke at one at 200yds, but not anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
You've asked about .44 Magnums. With a 240 running at a bit over 1300 fps, I sight in dead on to 1" high @ 25, which puts impact a couple inches high @ 50, back dead on @ 75, and about 5-6 inches low @100 yds. with my grip and eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
No matter what you sight your gun into. Every time you head out to the range take the 44 and about 18 rounds with you and shoot at 1/2 your distance, your distance and a little beyond your distance. And do it in the positions you plan on using when hunting. Just because you sighted in the gun to a distance does not help you 3 to 6 months later if you have not shot it at regular intervals.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top