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Hello Guys and Gals, :D

I have read these posts and their all great. I have the single shot bug and I’m looking for a High-Wall in .45-70 with a 30 to 34 inch barrel to be used with smokeless powder only with 1000 yard shooting in mind. I’ve notice that browning no longer makes theirs any more. My question is what make and model, past or present, of High-Wall do you recommend? And what are the pros and con’s of each? I don’t really want to spend much more than $1,500.00 for it. Thank you all for your replies in advance.

Donna
 

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Donna you might still find a NIB Browning BPCR for that price or near that price or maybe a slightly used one. I shot mine only with smokeless when I had it and sold it in near new condition for less than that amount. IMR3031 really works well in it. That's the one I'd recommend. Also if you get it and aren't going to shoot in registered competition you might want to consider having a Pachmayr Decelerator pad added to replace that steel butt plate it has from the factory. With 500 grain and over bullets recoil is stiff even in that heavy rifle.

GB
 

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Hi Dona. You can buy a nice American made Shiloh for that money as long you dont put anything fancy on it . Lp.
 

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Another alternative that comes close to your budget:



New Model 1885 "Highwall" Sporting Rifle

Standard Rifle Description: Receiver with Octagon Top, available with 26", 28" or 30" Tapered Full Octagon Barrel, Blade Front Sight, Buckhorn Rear Barrel Sight, Single Trigger, Drilled and Tapped for Optional Tang Sight. Butt Stock is Straight Grip, Bridgeport Checkered Steel Butt Plate, Length of pull is 14" approximately. Forend: Schnabel Style. Wood: Premium Straight Grain Oil Finished American Walnut. Metal Finish: Receiver Group & Butt Plate Color Case Hardened. Barrel: Blued. French Gray Receiver available. Overall length: 47 inches. Approximate weight: 9 lbs., 4 oz. The above rifle is shown with optional (at extra cost) Deluxe Mid-Range Tang Sight, Globe w/ Spirit Level Front Sight, Extra Fancy Walnut Stock and 30" No. 1 Heavy Barrel. Contact C. Sharps Arms for catalog and additional information. (Options and accessories available) Shown: 30" barrel.
Price: $1,350.00 Suggested Retail


http://www.csharpsarms.com/bossgun.htm


Chuck
 

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For the money, you will not beat a Browning BPCR right out of the box and they look good too. They are available new or slightly used, regularly, well below your price. They fit all your needs and the barrel is top of the line. The sights are not bad and the trigger is OK but needs $25.00 worth of work to be perfect.
I have 4 of them and nothing made will out shoot them. If you ever decide to sell it, you will make money, not lose.
Dozer
 

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I’ve heard anywhere from 30-90 days. Now that’s only hearsay, I’m a “Ballard” Highwall man, so I haven’t ordered one! With some of the BPCR companies it depends on what options IE barrels etc. when you get it. They do guns in "lots" so if you order something different, you'll wait a little longer. I ordered a Ballard HW in July of 2001 and received it in Sept 2002. Turned around and ordered another one in OCT 2002 and they just told me to expect it in March. It depends on what they're making a run of and when.

I’ve seen a couple C-Sharps HWs and watched them shoot and they are well made. I think it’s the “least costly” HW you can order and get it “your way”. The Ball-Walls start at $2050, so at $1500 or so, the C-Sharps is a bargain. You also don’t have to a degree in engineering to break it down like the Browning’s :grin:

Chuck

PS: Keep on your friend, he’ll come around, they all do.
 

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Donna,
I agree the Browing BPCR is is a good choice. It is a complete package ready to go. The only reservations are its weight - pretty heavy as rifles go, -makes it a chore just to get it out of the safe without a major collision. With the 45/70 you will need to reload to produce good accuracy at a reasonable cost. However you have to balance the ballistic performance against the recoil. Top smokeless loads can produce high velocity at the cost of a lot of recoil. You will need to load smokeless down to your comfort level. I have to concur with your choice of smokeless, even though it is offensive to others here. My smokeless cleanup takes 4 patches, that is it.
One other option the Browning has at no extra cost. If you want to test your ammo with a scope, the BPCR is drilled and tapped.
Ed
 
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