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Any one know what the best ammo is for the Gamo Viper? Mine is all over the place I sighted it at 33 yards on my bench master and yikes. Is this asking for two much?

4.5 cal .177 I shot crossman copperhead premium pellets .

If you need more info about it let me know. I assume all gamo vipers are the same?

Thx
 

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The best ammo for YOUR Viper is the ammo that delivers the best accuracy in YOUR rifle.

Sorry, but that's the way it is with spring piston air rifles, generally. In other words, you can have two rifles of identical make and model and they can even be consecutively serial numbered and one may very well show a preference for one ammo type and the other will prefer something else. If you understand fully everything that is going on when you discharge a spring piston air rifle, the surprise isn't that this in the general way of things, but that sometimes, you do have RARE exceptions....

A good example is that most people that I know who shoot .20 R-9's find top accuracy in Beeman Field Target Specials. But that again is kind of exceptional and there are probably .20 R-9's out there that don't shoot FTSs worth a hoot.

Also, when you fully understand all that is going when you discharge a "springer," you'll understand why they generally don't shoot well when fired off a solid rest. Attempts at constraining these guns typically result in irratic groups. Proper springer technique involves a consistant hold that is the same from shot to shot and allows the rifle to freely recoil while maintaining proper follow through. And if that seems like "freely recoil" and "proper follow through" don't go together, you aren't half wrong.

There are some spring piston air rifles on the market that are capable of stellar accuracy that rivals a fine turnbolt rimfire sporting rifle -like Theoben Crusaders, for example. Getting all the precision that these rifles are capable of, however, requires a very disciplined shooting technique, and it is one that probably has more in common with shooting flintlock muzzle loaders than nitro-burning "suppository" arms. Also, just because you're the reigning smallbore champion at your local club, that skill level doesn't automatically translate to getting the most out of a springer. But, if you AREN'T the smallbore champion at your club, and WANT to be, mastering a spring piston air rifle will, in my view, get you a looooooong way toward that goal. You'll develop consistant technique that most cartidge arm shooters never see the need to work toward.

Finally, Gamo could do the world a favor and ship material in with their products that clearly explains why you probably aren't going to see anything close to accuracy with most springers until you've shot through a break in period.

In a nutshell, these guns typically come from Europe or Asia, or some other far off place. They're lubricated to prevent internal corrosion, and sometimes overlubricated for what you'd want in an everyday shooter. Until the excess lube burns off, and the seals start to wear in and seat correctly, you can and probably will have dieseling that isn't consistant from shot to shot. This in turn will cause blown pellet skirts and or uneven obturation in the bore. The effect of that is similar to a poorly crowned barrel. The projectile isn't evenly released from the muzzle, and yaw is introduced. Couple that with velocity swing, and patterns rather than groups are a predictable result.

Ditch the powderbuner benchrest technique. Shoot though the break in process with proper springer technique, and you'll very likely wind up being pleased with how your Viper performs.

-JP
 

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JP is spot on in everything he's told you, so heed it well.

Go ahead and keep shooting the crossman pellets you've already got. You paid for them, so burn them up. Use them to break in the gun.

Look for the balance point of your rifle. When you're shooting off of a rest, you should have a sandbag under the balance point, and that should be the only point a rest should contact your gun. The gun should balance on the bag, and as long as you're consistent, you should be able to get the best groups your gun and pellet combo are capable of, or at least it worked for me with my .22 caliber RWS-52.

After that, do yourself a favor and order a Straight Shooter's Pellet Sampler (my only affiliation with them is that I bought my RWS-52 and some pellets from them).

I ordered their .22 caliber pellet sampler when I ordered my RWS-52 from them. I quickly discovered that my gun likes the heavy Logun Penetrators (discontinued, unfortunately) and the Beeman Kodiaks. It won't shoot anything much lighter than Crow Magnums very well at all. The only .22 caliber pellets I've been able to find locally are the Daisy wadcutter pellets, and those shoot all over the paper at 20 yards. I've bought the last of those, and I'll stick with the Kodiaks out of my gun.
 

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"The best ammo for YOUR Viper is the ammo that delivers the best accuracy in YOUR rifle."

I keep hearing this repeated again and again and it is pure BS. Airgun pellets are not bullets, and many are out and out junk! Would you put a 17 hm2 bullet in your 22 LR? I think not! Even the Crosman Premiers have gotten so bad that they are unshootable in some guns! Crosman's QC has gone the way of the American politician!

The simple truth is and has always been, domed or round nosed pellets, are best due to the fact that pellets are hollow! Static and dynamic unbalance are major problems with all airgun pellets. Many of the pellets won’t shoot well past 25 yards, even in 1000 dollar PCP rifles!

The next thing you know some guy will be selling pre-64 Winchester air rifles! The only thing worse than reading the BS in the gun rags is having 900 parrots repeating everything those clowns are told by their gun making employers tell them to say. If you think that they work for some so called magazine then perhaps you should ask who pays for the advertising that keeps that rag in business?

Having said that, I like the JSB’s, but the H&N, (sold under the Beeman name), and the Crosman Premier 7.9 grain, are usually good. However there is no guarantee that the Premiers will be any good. They have become iffy at best. I really don’t care what you put in your Gamo, or as I like to call them “crapo triggers “ or crooked barrels… but you will find that the round nosed pellets will shoot much better at longer distances and will shoot a whole lot better in the wind...

Just my two sense!

Jim
 
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