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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, thanks in andvance for the feedback.

I have a 1911 Colt Commander Mark IV 80 Series.
What poundage recoil spring was factory installed with these guns?

After reading the spring discussion earlier I was considering upgrading,
but I did not know where I was starting from.

Thanks!

Jonathan
 

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I don't have a Comander, but during some research of my own on Colt springs I came up on the information that Wolff Springs Co. listed the "Factory Spring" poundage as an 18lb spring.

Hope this helps ya. It's a starting point, anyway. When I talked to the Wolff Tech line today they were very helpfull and able to stear me to a good starting point for my needs.

W. C. Wolff Co.
1-800-545-0077


Greeenriver(I was lost in a field of springs, now I know where to start, anyway) :D :D
 

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Yes, an 18 lb is factory standard for a Commander. Springs get their "power" from a combination of length of throw and tension of the spring (in lbs). To get the same end results as full sized 1911, the spring must have more tension to compensate for the 3/4" shorter throw and shorter spring. What ever you do, don't use a full length spring in a Commander. When the slide blows back and the spring compresses, it will demo your spring plug or bend the lower slide extension.

If you look at the chart in the other post, you can add 2 lbs to each recoil spring weight for the full sized 1911 and get the same results for a Commander.
 

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If you buy a few springs to try don't mix them up your better off painting one end to mark them so you know what they are because the length doesn't always determind the size. I have three springs sitting here I just recieved from Wolf and while the 20lber is a tad shorter than the 22lber the 23lber is shorter that the 20 & 22lbers. While the spring wrap maybe the same(distance between the coils) the wire diameter or material can be different thus changing the tention while still having less length too. I notice that each of these higher tention springs(20,22 & 23lb) from Wolf come with a new firing pin spring too. Just a little spring food for thought.
BigBill
BTW; Nail polish is a great thing to have handy sometimes!!!!!
 

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BigBill, Good advise on marking the springs. Also a good observation on spring length. I have a spring tension scale that I use religiously. I find all Wolff springs are within 1/2 lb of advertised weight. Other brands and even many factory equipped springs are not even close to specs (usually light).

Just a note on your Norinco... Please don't take this wrong, I am not slamming your gun. Norincos, Chas Dalys, and other guns made in China or the Philippines have real hit and miss metallurgy. Some are so hard they fracture, others are so soft they batter. Most are in between and hold up quite well. If I owned your gun, I would use the springs I recommended in the other post else you may beat it to death. Yes, a heavy spring gives the illusion of straight forward pressure but when you fire it, it's not the same. The stiffer the spring, the more wear you will see in the slide rails and the more battering of the internal parts. The only time you should be using a 20 lb or above is with heavy loads and I wouldn't recommend doing so with your gun. Just some advise... no malice intended.
 

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Iowegan; No problem I understand. My norinco is well used and i'm not sure how tight they are when there new but she sure does have that "45 rattle". I play it safe and make sure I "moly it up" at every place there is metal to metal contact so no more wear will occur. Moly stops wear dead in its tracks. But if you put too much moly on it, it can slow down the functioning too. I use it sparingly on my 45. I have noticed even if i put too much on my recoil spring with the full length guide it can really slow it down so just a little will reduce all wear and speed the cycling time up too. On the slide I like to work it in while the slide is empty then wipe off the excess and assemble it. The gun will seem a little tight at first but work it by hand a few times and you will see it loosen up then its ready to be shot. Using the right lube can sure cut down on wear. And with moly your wear will be zero even the bluing won't wear off were there is metal to metal contact.

Where to put moly on the 45acp;
Frame rails, frame on the detent pin, slide rail grooves, bottom of the slide in the detent pocket, barrel on the bushing wear area, barrel lugs, barrel link, Recoil spring, full length guide rod (recoil spring) & trigger sear.

I don't want to beat this moly thing to death but "WEAR" is our enemy and if we can eliminate it all together our guns will last forever and moly does this. You have an insurance policy against wear and sometimes you don't realize it.
I was rebuilding gravely tractors and selling them part time.
I rebuilt one Gravely tractor(my own) and i recoated the cylinder with moly when i bored it and put a new piston in it. I didn't realize it had a spun rod bearing because you have to press the crank part to see it. It was just my bad luck the oil hole was lined up with the hole in the rod when i checked it when the crank was together. I went out tilling gardens with this machine and after my third garden the motor sputtered a little when i finished it. When i got home i started tilling my garden at home when it sputtered again and i realized something was wrong with it. I took the motor apart and the cylinder and piston never got oil squirted from the rod it only got some from the splash from the crank bearings which was very little. Upon inspection the cylinder was ok, the piston could be reused but only the rings were cooked. This is an air cooled engine that ran with hardley any oil going to the cylinder while tilling gardens. Like i said its an insurance policy you don't know you have until something happens. I consulted my local dealer were i buy my parts and what caused this was the previous owner ran the machine with heavy oil in it in the winter so the crank had no oil so the bearing spun. The heavy oil in the cold weather makes it take a longer to get thru the oil filter so a by pass oil line for cold weather operation is needed. It was a fluke thing that the oil hole was lined up when i checked it too. I must of rebuilt about 50 machines and i never seen this again but i sure did check them more closely and this happened to my own machine too. Moly sure saved my butt that day just the parts could of run into many $500 all i needed was a $20 set of rings and a new rod/bearing/crank pin. Now its only $20 can of moly my guns never leave home without it.

Since the moly weathered so well in a over heated air cooled engine sure raised the idea in my mind to apply it in the gas system of the semi-auto rifles like the AK47 and SKS ect. I know most guys (99.9%) run their gas systems with no lube and they will say the gas system needs no oil but there has been many yugo sks's that were sold as just shooters with wornout gas systems?? So moly is on ever piston/tube in every gas system in ever semi-auto gun i own too!!!!!
 
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