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Discussion Starter #1
I live in western Washington and i really like to hunt forest grouse and rabbit i am fairly successful but i would like to come back with more than just one or two for a whole days hunt at least enough for the family pot. So that leads me to the question of what kind of dog i should get i don't have one now i have had few dogs growing up but nothing more than the standard house/family pet. thanks , Justin
 

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I have a Beagle that hunts close to me. If he puts a pheasant out it is usually in gun range. Once he gets on a rabbit, he's off to the races! Bingo is also a good house pet and protects my home.
 

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I would definitely recommend a "versatile" breed. They are bred for just that sort of thing. As I have stated in the past I'm definitely a Drahthaar man.
 

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I have a Jack Russell. He hunts close and checks back in when in heavy brush. Hogs, rabbits, squirrel, pheasant, you name it, and he's up for it. Force trained him to come in, as he is a fighter if he sees other dogs. His one penchant is cats. He hates them, and takes them apart to see how they work, but is not mechanically inclined enough to put them back together properly. With all his other skills, the cat part I value the most. I hate'em. So he will always have a home and all the Science Diet he can eat. ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I really am a novice when it comes to dog lingo but i do love all animals and if you can't eat it or it's not destroying something then i feel you should let it be . I love cats had em all my life especially my bobcats they are wonderful loving intelligent animals as are the dogs ive had but ive really thought of getting a beagle but i don't know how hard they are to train . thanks ,superdown
 

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Other than obedience training, if you get a beagle from good hunting stock they will pretty much train themselves. The key on any hunting dog is getting it in the woods as early (young) as possible and as often as possible. If you get a beagle, be sure to get hunting stock or what they call a "grade" beagle.
One of your problems is so many breds have been screwed up by the AKC and the American female that they are worthless for their intended purpose. The beagle has an actual split between bench (show) dogs and field (hunting) dogs.
A pup introduced into a home with cats usually doesn't have a problem. Or a problem that can't be easily cured by a little firmness with both sides. The main thing is letting the dog know that you're in charge not him.
 

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Actually, the AKC is producing some fine hunting dogs.....I was lucky enough to place one second at the nationals a few years back.

http://www.ubgf.com/

http://dsbgf.com/

http://www.mid-west-gundog.com/

http://www.nebgf.org/

There are AKC brace beagle that are not suitable for hunting.........

I've also seen some that run fast and without regard to the line...... that I wouldn't give up a bullet to kill them with......

Grade dogs can be quite good.......and they can also be quite bad as well.......
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was looking at dog breeds and i saw something called a harrier beagle some say they are not a beagle and some say they are but to me they just look like a beagle on stilt's i thought it would be nice to have a slightly taller dog but if they are temperamental or generally Ornery id rather just stick with the tried and true beagle . Justin
 

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The Harrier is an intermediate sized dog between a beagle and a walker. I don't know how the beagle got added? I don't know anything about the dogs temperment.

VC, lets discuss the Irish Setter, the Cocker Spanial, the English Setter, the Beagle, beginning now the Border Collie, the various toy breeds that have to be delivered by cecerian(spl) section, the English Bulldog same as the toys, etc. Thats just off the top of my little bald head. For a dog to be featured in a Disney movie is the kiss of death. I will give the AKC this: they are now, at least, giving thumb nails of breed personalities at the shows. I guess they started this after a few kids were mauled by dalmations and folks found out that Jack Russells were not really lap dogs. ;D
 

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I don't know what to tell you........

Yes, by the early seventies AKC beagles were, for the most part, not suited for hunting.

In the mid seventies, the AKC adopted small pack option rules as well as keeping brace and large pack rules.

I kept grade dogs for a few years in the late seventies/early eighties.

Honestly, IMO, the AKC hounds are a little to hard driving and not as close on the line as I personally like. A hound that keeps the line moving is much better than one that goes over on a check........

There are at least 12 beagle clubs running AKC small pack option rules in the state of Tennessee.

The ARHA (american rabbit hunters association) also has a class for AKC bread hounds.

The UKC is also sponsoring a gun dog hound in there field trial events.

There are plenty of pure bread hounds that will do a fine job rabbit hunting.

The biggest problem facing the people who register and promote AKC hounds are rising fees for registration as well as increases in entry fees for field events along with DNA testing without offering that service to a hound buyer. The DNA thing has made a bunch of people mad. While the AKC requires any stud dog who breeds over 3 litters a year or seven litters for life to be DNA certified, it doesn't require the same for it's bitches, nor will it test a pup which I might buy in order to determine if it came from the stock it was suppose to be from.

I really think the liberals have take control the AKC.....and if you follow the money......it ain't in field trials, but rather in dog shows.

What used to be a poor man's sport is quickly being priced out of reach.

But.....don't think they won't hunt and run......as they certainly will........and much more consistently than cold blooded stock IMO
 

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VC, I had a nice response for you and had a senior moment and erased it. Oh well. Anyway, it sounds like the AKC has changed for the better since I was fooling with beagles. I hope so since the beagle is too great a little dog to be just a house pet. ;D
 

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beemanbeme said:
VC, I had a nice response for you and had a senior moment and erased it. Oh well. Anyway, it sounds like the AKC has changed for the better since I was fooling with beagles. I hope so since the beagle is too great a little dog to be just a house pet. ;D
Thanks Bee......Trying to get together a rabbit hunt soon.......deer season right now.......

It's getting hard to find a place to hunt any more.......
 

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I lived in Memphis when I kept beagles and there was a lot of areas around there that was "flood plain" land that couldn't be developed because of annual flooding from the Mississippi. Which made it sweet for bird and rabbit hunters. I've trapped (illegally) coyote, bobcats, fox, mink, beaver, muskrats, ****, and more possums than I care to remember inside the city limits of beautiful downtown Memphis. Lots of urban deer also. ;D
 

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A lab mix. I have a lab/? mix that is about 60 lbs. He showed up in my garage one morning as a puppy. No one claimed him and he turned out awsome. Retrieves pheasant listens well, family friendly. He also runs coyotes. He has had no obedience training or retrieving training and must have some awsome instinct.
 

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You can always get a Standard Poodle. In Montana they breed them to hunt, which is true to their original breeding as hunters and guard dogs; down South, so I've been told, they are bred to fight. In neu yawk citee they are bred to drink latte, speak french and pick your pockets.

A good all around breed. And none of mine have ever given up on a rabbit, squirrel, chipmonk, whitetail or coyote. JMTCW. Mikey.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Mikey , poodles are really used for hunting ? sounds interesting . How did you get into using them for hunting ? is the standard poodle different from the ones with the funny looking hair cuts ? Superdown
 

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I thought Poodles were originally bred for retrieving, but what the hey, I have been wrong before. ANYWAY, I have one (a little one), and though his courage is a mile wide and an inch deep, he would make one heck of a squirrel dog (providing the squirrel doesn't stop to fight.), but momma says no, as it messes up his haircut.
I guess me and ole Huff (a Jack Russell) are still on our own. ;)
 
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