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Hello every one,

I was wondering and maybe along with future swagers, what type of bench you felt you needed for swaging, as in type and strength, and of what material is it made from?

I felt I needed a very strong bench for swaging. And like my daddy, I too tend to over build things. Oh well, it will not brake and will last me a lifetime. This is my bench made of 2X4 frame tied together by 8 – steel galvanized T brackets (Simpson’s RTC24), the type of bracket that the 2X4’s slide into and is screwed or nailed, I screwed mine in place. The top is made of two layers of ¾ inch plywood and that is topped off with a 1/8 inch galvanized steel plate. The top of the work bench is 36 inches high, 38 inches long, and 24 inches deep.

On the left is the Corbin CSP-1, On the right is an RCBS Rockchucker, and the black barr in between the presses is Corbin's PCS-2 Magnum core cutter. And you can pick out the rest. :grin:

Donna

 

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Donna,I have the same type of bench, but without the extra layers of ply and iron on top. The legs are 2x4 too, and are not elaborately fixed to the table. I've found that on those few occasions where real stress occurs on the press handle, it's on the up stroke so I just lean on the table as I work the handle. So, the legs really haven't yet taken any abuse. Holes are drilled in the table's top whenever it's needed for the various tools I had or that have come along later (canneleur, Mity-mite, CSP-1, wire cutters, Corbin lead molds, and so forth). Usually, I remove all the tools after the bullet types I've been working on are finished. I do have a very heavy iron pedistal about 2.5' high that weighs about 80# that another CSP-1 is mounted on, that is portable, that I keep in the swaging area, but out of the way until it's needed. How the table is set up depends upon what type of bullet I'm working on at the moment. If I find I need a better arrangement of the tools, I just drill more holes. I also find that those cup-cake pans come in real handy, too, to hold small parts, and in-process bullets. 8)
 

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Ya shore do have a little bench Donna. I have two. One is 8' and the other is 4' and I'm thinking real seriously I need another 8 footer this year. Been meaning to do it last two years but haven't gotten my round tuit yet. It will replace the 4' bench tho so it won't be adding a full extra 8' of space. And I don't even swage and do my casting in another area. :eek:

GB
 

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GB,
It is small. When I built it I was living in a studio apartment, not much room. But now I'm in a larger place and have a little more room. I'm planning to making another bench 4ft long to go next to the bench I already have.

Talon,
It sounds like a good way to go. But I tend to like to leave everything on the bench, hate putting my tools away. :-D

What about taking a pic of you all's work benches so we can have a birds eye view of them. If you don't have a place on the web to put them send the pic's to me and I'll give them a home for you to use. Send them in bit map form and in the subject line put Bench Pic's. :wink:

Donna
 

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I think that once one has torn up a bench or two by swaging - or reloading belted magnums - that one designs the bench MUCH stronger.

I look to my next bench as having 1/4" steel plate on the top in the are where the presses will be.
 

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Hello all, :D

1/4 inch steel plate, hummm. I sure would not want to try to lift it. But it did bring to mine, what little is left, of the perfect table top to use. You know the Boilerplate that the road destruction people use on the roads so cars can go over big holes without falling in, hummmmm. :-D

Donna
 

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Donna -
Yea. What I am looking for will be something that I can bolt to an existing wooden table or desk - and only as wide as i need it - maybe 12" wide and 24 or 36 inches deep. That would spread the forces out so the planks don't come apart.

And, you guessed it, it'll be a scrounged piece of scrap iron.
 

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swaging bench

I built mine out of 1/2 inch steel plate that is 4x4 set on steel pipe that is 2" id diameter. all the presses are bolted directly to it. Now I just need to know how to do it without messing things up.
 

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I finally remembered to take a tape downstairs and measure mine. I have an unfinished basement, so space wasn't a major issue.

My bench is 8 feet long, 30" deep and 32" high. I used 2X4 spruce as a framing material, and topped it with 3/4" plywood and a linoleum top. I tied it into the studs behind and the floor to make it solid. It has a lower shelf for bulk storage, and I also have a metal shelving unit for other storage.

I have my CSP II (with mounting base) mounted on the right hand front end, and my core cutter "around the corner" on the end. I have my cannelure tool on the left hand end. In the centre, I have mounted my mitre saw for cutting off tubing, and on the left I've set up my annealing/core-bonding station. Along the back (toward the right of the bench) I have several metal cabinets with plastic drawers for storing my samples, dies and punches.

I've also set up a workmate with a grinding wheel and vice mounted for halving bullets, and any other special jobs I may need done.

For lighting, I installed 3 double fluorescent fixtures, and I've provided 3 wall mounted (above the bench top) electrical outlets for anything I may need.

I have a completely separate room set up for reloading. I have two "C" presses mounted on an old solid wood (2" top) table with shelving all round.
 

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benches

something all these have in commong is strenght and durability. nothing like a bad bench to leave a bad tast in some ones mouth for doing there own bullet making or reloading.
one other thing you might think about is attaching the bench to the wall or floor so that it does not move back and forth as you are working the presses. all my benches are made of 1 1/2 inch of plywood top or 2X12 rough oak planks covered with a 1/4 inch sheet of plywood for smothness. then bolted to the wall with lag bolts. you can not move it to clean under it but what the heack and god help you if you drop a case or bullet or small screw and it rolles under it.

you have the right idea build it atleast 2 times as tought as you think you need it and at least 2 times as big because things will be added in the future. also you might think about some over head shelves on the wall to hold the lighter things like books and die sets. if you are realy fancy you can make them cabinets but like you i like to see what i have where.

butch
 
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