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We're wanting to start building a long term food supply. I say we start with canned goods we use anyway and build up a 2 or 3 month supply and then rotate sock to keep it fresh. Then start adding in long term storage foods i.e. the prepackaged buckets of beans, rice, wheat, ect. What do you have store and how much? Do you have a system to rotate it to keep it fresh?
 

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Re: whats in your long tern food supply?

For grains, we just seal them up in what we've got (like a culligan jug full of corn). Weevils can be a problem when buying a 50 lb. sack at the feed mill, but there are a number of ways to snuff weevils. Moisture content is probably a more important concern, since weevils croak in a sealed container for lack of oxygen. Dry beans last about forever. Probably a lot of beans waiting on Y3K. Flour can be ground a little at a time, so it will take a while to go through 50#. Green beans we canned and figure on eating a quart a wk. Tomatoe juice, a qt. every other wk, but it represents stew or soup of some kind. Chicken we canned in pints, as a pint makes a good pot pie for 2. Most of the canned stuff we figure on eating within a year, but it will last a lot longer, but its kind of crazy to put up more than you can eat in a year. Some old boy gave us 5 gal. of glucose 20 yrs ago. Its still good, (for what I ain't got a clue). So is honey. Some honey sugars easily, but liquifies when heated, so no big deal. When I get it, It goes in jars and sits there. Keeps for the long haul. Freezing is about the easiest, so sweet corn goes there, and its whatever we didn't eat off the cob when it was ripe. Don't know how much, but somewhere around a pint and a half a week. Roadkill gets frozen, and whatever I might shoot. Nuts and berries same unless short on space, then canned. Pumpkin got canned last yr and still have a few jars, so we overdid that, but its still good. Still have nuts in the shells, but they stay good if they don't get bugs. We used to make sausage, but after 6 mos it goes bad in the freezer. Canned, it lasts years, but a family needs to figure their current diet and go from there. Watch out for the mice. They'll steal you blind! (That's where sulfur comes in handy.)
 

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We have 100+ qts. of Tomato,beens,beets,apple and fruit canned. 7+ cases of store bought canned products,flour and beans. And am working on getting a few cases of MRE's saved up.Not enough as far as I'm concerned. Would like to double what I have by next spring. gypsyman
 

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We have several cases each of commercial canned corn, canned diced tomato, canned green beans, evaporated milk, coup, stuff we use all the time anyway. 40 lbs of rice, corn meal and a bunch of 5 # bags of whole wheat flour. Bunches of bags of beans. Throwing the bags of flour, rice and beans in the freezer for a week or so seems to kill any bugs. Then they go in plastic buckets with lids.

We rotate through to keep fresh items in storage.

Don't forget water, toothpaste, soap, and the other hygiene items as well.

-WH-
 

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Presently have 2 deer, approx 35 homeraised chickens, not to count the 11 laying eggs, 1/4 pig, approx 30 lbs beef and enough home canned tomatoes and frozen vegetables to get us by until next summer. If only I had room for a milk cow.

Ron
 

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Store bought canned goods should last up to two years or even longer. I am still using rice I bought and put in sealed plastic 5 gallon buckets during y2k and it is still good. You will need a big pantry. Get a good freezer, with a good generator, for your meats. Dry goods adequately sealed will last forever, like beans, rice, whole wheat kernels, not flour. Vacuum seal meats will last 2 years frozen. Hunt, fish, and learn what wild animals and plants are eatable in extreme conditions. Rotate, rotate, rotate on everything. Buy a pressure canner to can your own home grown veggies and meats. Build a smoke house to smoke meats, or learn to salt and sugar cure meats. Visit an Amish community.
 

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Since I raise pinto bean seed you might say I'm sitting on enough to last a while. Presently have about 70,000 pounds of this year crop. We garden raise and can most of our veggies. The freezer is full of elk and as long as we have electricity that's a good thing.

BeanMan
 

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electricity is the key. once we lose that, we are back in the late 1800's as far as food storage goes. in fact even farther back as we have lost the knowledge and the acess to the supplies we need ,that they had.i can live maybe 2 years on what i have on hand supplemented by deer, squirrel, rabbit, ****, etc.well if no one steals all my cows maybe a lot longer. lol this is why a close knit society of small groups is how it will work.yu butcher a pig, yu give me some before it spoils, i butcher a cow i give yu some before it spoils, i got extra beans i trade them to yu for sum eggs.yu got more taters than yu can store? ill take sum and give yu sum venison in the future.its all a pay it forward type thing.thats how they did it years ago.its all so simple, yu want to survive, i want to survive, we git along. thats whats lacking in todays society.
 

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buying a few book on this subject is probably just as important.
I would think having this information on hand would be as valuable as the food you are wanting to store. Especialy if a time comes when we wont have internet to go to for info. the older we get, the more we forget.
As Winter Halk stated,
Toiletry & first aid should be included on your list of things to store up on & just as important.

Rice,flour,weat,grain,baking powder/soda,salt, pepper,garlic/onion powder,canned everything, ect.
 

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You have a good start. Besure to store what you family will eat. You can get your beans , wheat, & ect. in pre package in cans.With hole wheat you will need a grinder, then bake some bread and try it.

You also need to work for a year supply of all you need. You may not need It but friends may. But I do know familys who have lived on their food storage because of some type of lost.

Go for it, do research.
 

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I found that you can "can" things like rice in their dry form. will keep bugs and spoilage away. Just fill the canning jar with rice, dried corn, nuts etc. place canning lid on lightly, place in the oven at 175 deg F for about 25 min.. remove and tighten lid. will create a vacume and will then keep for long periods. I leave quart jars in longer.
 

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doctor once told me that if push came to shove a man could live on peanut butter crackers and rice.
 

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I can three to four cases of yellowfin tuna each year. Give some to my inlaws and some to the kids but have a pint myself most every week. Hard to beat. I like sweet potatoes and navy beans also.
 

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Dried rice and dried beans in airtights with anti moisture bags. Can goods have a marked shelf life of about two years, but if out of the sun and in normal temps will last 20 yrs or more. We have all the above. I also have a bumper crop of squirrils out back that could contribute to stew...... :D
 

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i just last week ate a can of beans i purchased at wal mart that was 2 yrs past date.had been laying behind the seat of my dozer, layed it up on the exhaust manifold for about 20 min, opened it with my pocket knife, tasted fine and i didnt git the trots.but im hard like that!
 

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Somewhere I read to store bulk grain for the long term, put it in a plastic bag in a can. Bury a chunk of dry ice near the bottom. Loosely close the plastic, leave the can lid off till the dry ice quits steaming. Then seal everything up. This packs the grain in a CO 2 atmosphere which is better for long storage
 

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Soybeans store dry without any protection from weivels and such. Dry in a plastic bucket with a lid. They are similar to hard plastic. They also have a days supply of complete protien and fat from about a cup. They soak real fast prior to cooking. They can be sprouted to supply a lot of vitamins and enzymes like green vegetables. eddie
 

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Someone gave us some soybeans over 12 years ago. My adult son discovered he likes to munch them last year as much as I do when I showed him the old stash. After I gave my son some of the stash I still have what little bit is left stored in a 2 liter bottle. I like to just eat them dry, but my teeth are not as good as they used to be.

I store dehydrated tomatoes in plastic jugs as well. Some just salted, others salted and peppered, and still others painted with hot sauce before I dehydrate them. I have eaten 6 year old tomatos stored like this. Dried bell pepers, summer suash and cubed pumpkin, but I was not overly fond of any of those. The pumpkin was the best I guess. I have apple slices I dried. Fuji and Johnathan seem to store well and taste good. Wasn't too fond of dried Granny Smith's. Five cases of old MRE's which I should eat or throw out.

I'd like to begin storing more dried beans. Two liter pop bottles are tough in case they ever need to be pitched around and loaded in a hurry. Light weight too as well as the foods dry stored in them. Water stores well in them also and even those take a lot of abuse and don't leak when tossed around. Not nearly enough variety stored, but at least a start............Mike
 
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