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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A good hatchet doesn't have to come with a high price tag.
I found that the Estwing is very durable for an outdoor tool.
Solid steel one piece construction makes it ideal for any job at hand.
For general use, it's okay. For kindling of softwood such as pine and cedar,
can make the finest firestarter very well. Seasoned oak and hickory, well, that
can be quite a task with any hatchet. What about the scabbard ? It is well
made, and can hold the hatchet safely whether the snap strap is fastened or not.
This one is my goto hatchet when I may need extra help retrieving wood.


I also have a high end Gransfors hatchet. It is tremendously sharp. Therefore
must be handled carefully. It has a wide head which makes for ease of spliting wood,
but when it comes to small kindling, the wide head is too aggressive in my opinion.
It's wooden handle is susceptible to cuts and dings, and because of the tool's
value you need to be conscious of abusive usage.
The scabbard is more of a protective cover than a scabbard, although you can
attach it to your waist belt, do it with caution. Unlike the Estwing scabbard,
if you unsnap the Gransfors' scabbard while attached to your waist, it will
immediately fall out, and go straight to your foot. So you must always take hold
of the handle before unsnapping the holding strap. I was fortunate the poll hit my
foot,and not the blade end. It still caused swelling for sevearl days.


Conclusion: An expensive hatchet isn't necessary, but is an excellent tool nevertheless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
FourBee said:
I also have a high end Gransfors hatchet. It is tremendously sharp. Therefore
must be handled carefully. It has a wide head which makes for ease of spliting wood,
but when it comes to small kindling, the wide head is too aggressive in my opinion.
It's wooden handle is susceptible to cuts and dings, and because of the tool's
value you need to be conscious of abusive usage.
The scabbard is more of a protective cover than a scabbard, although you can
attach it to your waist belt, do it with caution. Unlike the Estwing scabbard,
if you unsnap the Gransfors' scabbard while attached to your waist, it will
immediately fall out, and go straight to your foot. So you must always take hold
of the handle before unsnapping the holding strap. I was fortunate the poll hit my
foot,and not the blade end. It still caused swelling for sevearl days.


Conclusion: An expensive hatchet isn't necessary, but is an excellent tool nevertheless.
 

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I have and use the Gransfors Small Forest Axe - I don't worry about mis-using it, whatever that would entail. It was expensive at the time but as time goes on, it was well worth it and I can't recall exactly what the price was, so I guess it didn't cause more than a couple months of adding water to the soup.

That axe/hatchet will probably still be used by someone a hundred years from now if I or someone else doesn't leave it somewhere and it grows legs before we return.

Handle it well and if you by chance need a few stiches some day - just look at it as a learning experience and that Gransfors is second only to a chainsaw around camp.
 

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FourBee said:
Which do you have preference for ?
If you are like me and pocket knives, I pretty much like them all.
That is true. The one I liked the best was my first that I bought at Sears in Omaha when I was a kid (around 1955). My sister has one like it that my father had. Small head and petite wooden handle with a leather sheath. The most recent one I acquired (other than the Coleman) was a KaBar with the Leather disk handle. I like it except the light weight head (about 3/16" thick) although I like the fact that the head is one piece with the handle.
 

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I use a Craftsman "Bicentennial Edition" hatchet that my dad bought new in 1976 obviously. It has served both of us well for almost 40 years.

Sent from my SM-S765C using Tapatalk
 

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If you only want to pack one tool, I've found that something like a "boy's axe" is more useful overall than either a hatchet or full-size axe around the campsite. This is what we use...


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Victor3 said:
If you only want to pack one tool, I've found that something like a "boy's axe" is more useful overall than either a hatchet or full-size axe around the campsite. This is what we use...


Nice axe Vic. Yup; a boy's ax is very useful.
 

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Gene, I think I might have that same small 'hunter's axe' in my selection! Cute little thing and it makes good kindling using a baton for safety; weighs about nothing. They were often characterized as 'kid's hatchets' but are a nice little tool. I much prefer a small axe to a large knife for the weight to usefulness for me. In this north country a small axe is better than a machete in most cases, but I keep a couple around anyway, just in case......
BTW, A while back we had a couple of threads on the Knife Forum about just such and we have a good bunch of comments and some linked pics there.
http://www.go2gbo.com/forums/knives-and-other-edged-weapons-discussion/anyone-in-to-tomahawks-and-axes/
and
http://www.go2gbo.com/forums/knives-and-other-edged-weapons-discussion/belt-and-pocket-axe's/
 
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