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There are many ways that rifle manufacturers put the barrels on long guns. Piller bedded, pressure point, free floated, glass bedded, even hot melt glued. Why? Are some cheaper? Are some more efficient to manufacture? Are some more accurate? Just wonderin.
 

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Why do rifle manufacturers put barrels on d

The examples you mentioned were not methods of installing a barrel. Actually they all refered to some type or form of bedding. Manufacturing techniques have a bearing on profitability and performance. The balance of these 2 is a measure of the utility of the weapon for the task at hand. Some of the things you mentioned are accurizing processes, some designed to stop deterioration, speed/ease manufacture, or uniform performance. Some are valuable, some not. But none of what you mentioned was a way to put on a barrel.
 

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Why do rifle manufacturers put barrels on d

:oops: My bad. Thanks for setting me straight gunnut. So are they all just as accurate, or are some better than others.
 

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Why do rifle manufacturers put barrels on d

That would depend on the individual rifle. MOST rifles will shoot acceptally for MOST shooters with a little upward pressure on the barrel. Its also cheap and easy to build on machines without a lot of handwork. Some will shoot better free floated. Some wont. The experimenting is what makes it fun and at times frusterating.
 

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Why do rifle manufacturers put barrels on d

I have found that as a general rule, sporter weight rifles shoot a bit better with forearm pressure on the barrel but the rifle stays put better(point of impact) with a floated barrel. Also barrels that have forearm pressure are more apt to be affected by the shooters use of a sling as a firing aid. I have built full length bedded rifles and they work pretty well but still not enough info for any certaintees. Pillar bedding is used not to improve accuracy so much as to allow for the bedding to remain stabil. Since wood compresses over time, pillar bedding halts that process ensuring bedding remains unchanged.. The hot glue gun crud that Winchester has used as bedding is a disgrace. It will disintegrate from repleated recoil.. I usually prefer a floated barrel as accuracy is usually just fine and the point of impact remains more consistant. I do not like synthetic stocks although I can tolerate them I much prefer a laminate. Of course nothing is as nice as a fine piece of walnut..
 
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