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I would think were only as good as what your server is only able to do. All an amplifier is going to do is to boost
an already weak signal on your end.
 

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Not exactly. WiFi signal isn't like analog radio - if you have a usable signal, everything needed to exted it is present, no loss of information. These devices can extend the range not by boosting the signal per se, but rather by producing their own signal. You place them near the edge of reliable signal from your existing WiFi router and connect them to the WiFi router. When you do that, they provide additional coverage beyond the point that your existing router signal gets too weak.
 

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Think of it as a repeater rather than a amp. You can use them to skirt environmental obstacles that block or impede LOS transmission.

I tend to not use signal extenders in my network design if you do not have too. They can be used in certain circumstances to good effect. But they are not a substitute for fixing an originating devices signal strength degrading due to antiquated or poor specs due to equipment age, or interference caused by congestion. Typically in a home or small office situation you are better off getting a new wi-fi router or AP to take advantage of the advances built in to to the newer devices, both in infrastructure and on the client side. That is my opinion at least based on my experience.
 

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Typically in a home or small office situation you are better off getting a new wi-fi router or AP to take advantage of the advances built in to to the newer devices, both in infrastructure and on the client side.
Our situation was that we had good coverage throughout the house, and had a newer router, but signal on the patio across the yard was weak and unstable. Putting an extender in the room nearest the patio solved it.
 
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