Graybeard Outdoors banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
...scare a bear or deer that is right under my stand or within ten yards. I ask because I really want to use my revolver for bear hunting, but I'm really concerned that the cocking noise will spook them. For those of you that have experienced this, what do you think?

Jon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,748 Posts
I usually don't let them get that close. If I see them coming, I pick an open spot and wait for them to get close. I then pull back the hammer and wait for them to step into the opening. But if they are close, they may hear the hammer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,065 Posts
I normally do not let the deer get that close to me. the closer they are the harder the shot can be due to extreme angles.

When I see the deer and decide it take it. I will take a look around and make sure everything is safe and no other animals or PEOPLE are around. I will then take position and cock the hammer keeping my finger off the trigger.
once the deer is in a good shooting position I will take another quick look around aquire the sight picture and shoot. I like to keep the deer out to about 20 yards or so.

I have taken deer at 10 feet from sitting on a fallen tree. the deer had no clue I was sitting on it and walked right past me. I do practice in pulling the hammer back very slow this helps to quiet things a bit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
handgun work

I agree with the others. Don't let the critters get so close before you take action. I have taken deer very close, and the sound of the cylinder locking up was not a problem. However I hunt with a double action revolver and practice firing double action.

My advice, if the animal is so close that you think they will spook wait until the time is right. A rushed shot with a handgun will most likely require a long walk. In the case of bear hunting potentially toward an angry opponent.


longwalker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,225 Posts
Its up to the individual animal.

I've had deer walk right up to me as I was sitting on a log, not really trying to be quiet. ...then I've had some that I swear they could hear my thoughts 250yds away and bolt like lightning.

I do try though to cock while the critter is at its farthest point away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses. I will be hunting bear over bait. I won't have a chance to cock the revolver while the bear is making its way in because the brush is so thick that I won't be able to see or hear the bear until it's in the bait pit. I wish it was easier than that, but it isn't. With all the hard work associated with baiting bear, I don't want to blow it with something ridiculous as cocking the gun. I realize it happens, but I would like to take those types of things out of the equation, if at all possible. This doesn't mean I'll forget the pistol (cause I really really want to use it), but I will look at all my options.

Here's another question. Of all the different types of single and double actions that you all have used, which one made the least amount of noise when being cocked?
For me this info is useful and could very well factor into my next revolver purchase.

Thanks,

Jon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,065 Posts
get your self a very good set of ampflied hearing protection, they are well worth the money. you should be able to hear the bear coming in before you see it and they will save your hearing as well.

My T/C encore and contenders are very quiet when done right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
A lot of species in South Africa - have been lost because of the hammer cocking. Until I got my Freedom Arms. Then I could cook the hammer without any "click".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
If you get caught with one close in try cupping your weak hand over the hammer to muffle the noise. Thumb it back one click at a time, real slow. Watch for any reaction after each click. You have some advantage in being above the animal in your tree stand. I've got away with this several times. You can also go a slow double action if the animal is that close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Its not often the game gets that close that the noise of cocking will spook them. Cock it while they are out a ways and finger outside the trigger guard and move finger onto trigger as they get within range.

If they are close enough that cocking the trigger may alarm the critter then use it double action. Key is here to practice double action shooting also before hunting season to ascertain what is required to get a good shot off double action.

Key is to practice both firing single and double action. Being a bow hunter, slow and deliberate is always the best approach to minimise movement and noise.

My experience from bow hunting is a deer usually locks up until it can work out what the threat is. That few seconds is enough to get a good shot off, sometimes even two. I have never hunted bear (yet) but would assume the same applies.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,748 Posts
mg66 said:
Its not often the game gets that close that the noise of cocking will spook them. Cock it while they are out a ways and finger outside the trigger guard and move finger onto trigger as they get within range.

If they are close enough that cocking the trigger may alarm the critter then use it double action. Key is here to practice double action shooting also before hunting season to ascertain what is required to get a good shot off double action.

Key is to practice both firing single and double action. Being a bow hunter, slow and deliberate is always the best approach to minimise movement and noise.

My experience from bow hunting is a deer usually locks up until it can work out what the threat is. That few seconds is enough to get a good shot off, sometimes even two. I have never hunted bear (yet) but would assume the same applies.
Now if one is using a single action for hunting, we have no choice but to cock the hammer. I have had deer close to me and when they did not like what either they saw of smelled, in one quick leap, they were out of there. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
On a Blackhawk holding the trigger back while cocking will reduce the amount of clicks to only the cyl stop BUT you BETTER Damn well practice this will an UNLOADED gun first to get the hang of it. You have to remember to let go of the trigger BEFORE the hammer. I usually place the thumb of my off hand between the hammer and frame for extra safety also gripping the cyl to quiet it down a bit.
Clicks, pops and snaps all seem to alert game animals more than thumps and bumps (lower freq)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
OK I HAVE SOME THING TO TOSS IN TO THE MIX
MIND YOU IVE NEVER BEEN IN THIS SITUATIONS BEFORE BUT UM
sorry for the caps but any ways

if u nead to cock the hammer then maybe have one of them mouth bleats in an make a call as u are cocking the hammer?


dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,548 Posts
I can't testify to the sound of a handgun hammer but, my muzzleloader hammer sure scared a whitetail away last year. And he was around 20 yards from my stand?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I agree with muffy

I agree with Muffy. To make the cocking sound less of an issue while hunting, I practiced (many times) cocking while depressing the trigger to make the cocking as quiet as possible. I, too, place my other thumb between the hammer and frame to prevent a misfire just in case. That is the only way I have found to quiet the cocking sound.

-Jeremy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
When I'm setting in a stand or ground blind I keep my hammer cocked. And my thumb between the hammer and the frame. And my fingers around the outside of the trigger guard.

Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
If it is bears on bait you are after wait unitl is chewing on some bait and he won't hear it, but for what it is worth by the time any animal hears the cock of the hammer it should be to late for them anyways. My gun is in the shooting position and my sight picture is pretty much lined up before I cock the hammer and when it is cocked the shot is taken before the animal even knows what happened. Just my experience.

Erick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,136 Posts
I have spooked deer and hogs that snuck up on me by cocking the hammer of my Bisley. If I know somethings coming into range I cock the hammer early, then rest the thumb of my support hand between the hammer and frame, just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Not meaning to step on any toes here, but . . . It occurs to me that sitting in a blind of any sort, especially an elevated one, with a cocked revolver is extremely risky. The potential for something happening to cause the hunter to drop the firearm cannot be dismissed. If this happens to a revolver that's already cocked it would be very easy for the gun to fall in such a manner that will cause it to fire. The hunter would have no control over the direction of the muzzle at the moment of firing and could be shot in the process.

Just my observations . . . 8)
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top