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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went up today and did some experimenting. I have had nothing but trouble with cheap Wolf .223 ammo. The stuff is really loaded hot and can glue itself into the chamber. I tried a tiny bit of Imperial Die Wax and it all extracted perfectly. I found that it is not the chamber that is sticking, but it is the neck. This ammo also has a red sealant at the neck to make it waterproof, and I am not sure whether it is the sealant or the laquer/or both that is the problem. But just a tiny bit of Imperial fixes the problem. I also tried applying it to the chamber area of the case and did not see any difference. It was only necessary on the neck. Just a tiny little bit on the tip of your finger will very easily do 20 rounds. I meant to bring along some Bore Butter to try but forgot. This is such a revelation...Wolf is so cheap by the brick, it is hardly worth re-loading for the .223. The hollow points are extremely accurate, and awesome for even just punching paper. They make BIG holes in paper targets that are clearly visible at 100 yds with a scope or binocs.
 

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If it were me, I'd shell out a little more $$ and throw (or disassemble) the Wolf crap away. If the brass sticks in the chamber, assuming the chamber isn't extremely rough, then you are exceding safe pressures. By lubing the case, you run major risk of streching your frame with those hot loads.

Not sure about Wolf brand, but some of the reloaded 223 rounds I have looked at hadn't been trimmed to proper length. That may be why you cases are sticking in the neck area. Check the case length.
 

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Gentleman,
Let's take a look at this situation for a minute: Step back and think about the fact that you have to lubricate your ammo so that it will extract... Now, look in the mirror and say it out loud..."I have to lubricate my ammo so that it will extract".
OK, do we still think it's a good idea to have to lubricate your ammo so that it will extract? Don't you hear the alarms and bells going off in your head? If not, I'd recommend a new hobby. You are missing a very important warning sign.

My opinion only.
Graycg
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok Guys........

Guys...have you tried this ammo? It is NOT a pressure problem. Did you READ the first post? IT IS the Laquer/or sealant. It is melting in the throat and sticking the shells in. These cases are not deformed, or jambed tightly into the chamber walls. The same cases after firing and extraction, fit cleanly back into the chamber. Apparently you havent been following the occasional posts about the Wolf ammo. It seems to work fine in most semi-auto's because it is extracted so quickly, but it sticks in some singles because the soft materials cool down and glue them in. In fact...my .223 sticks less after about 20 rounds heat it up.
YES, I load my own, but sometimes it is fun to use this cheap stuff, plus I like to be stocked up on milsurp in case of war.
If some of you guys dont want to shoot this ammo...by all means, dont shoot it. MY post was F.Y.I....for those who ARE INTERESTED in a remedy to the problem.
 

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Robert,

I haven't shot this ammo. I also haven't kept up with the other posts on the Wolf ammo.

In your first post, you stated, "The stuff is really loaded hot and can glue itself into the chamber".

Imperial die wax is designed to keep brass from sticking in dies. If you put it on a round, the brass doesn't want to cling to the chamber walls like it is suppose to. So, instead of clinging to the chamber walls, the case will put most its force on the frame.

You said you thought putting it only on the neck worked equally well. This still decreases the area of the case gripping the wall.

I was only pointing out that IMO(key words), it was not a wise thing to do.
 

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Chris,

See my post above.

Yes the Encore is stronger, but its weakness is still backthrust.

The Wolf ammo may be perfectly safe and within pressure limits. But using a lube to keep them from sticking-regardless of why they stick- isn't a wise thing, IMO.
 

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I shoot wolf in a mini-14 no problems. shot some 9mm in a glock 27 with a conversion barrel. if your shooting an ar which i don't own some will like some won 't but anyways you should only buy brass and save all the cheap russian ammo for me. im tired of seeing it get sold out.
i found some info on russian ammo its not the coating that makes it stick its usually a dirty chamber. you should either shoot only brass
or steel not mix till you clean. heres some good links..


http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu18.htm

http://www.ar15.com/content/page.html?id=268
 

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I don't think you have a pressure problem at all. The Wolf ammo (in my opinion) isn't necessarily "cheap", it's just inexpensive. I've always found that the Wolf ammo was reasonably accurate, and burns fairly clean. The primers are often hard to crack in some firearms. The coating that they use to prevent the steel cases from corroding is your problem. However.....

....I would NOT under any circumstances put any sort of lube or wax on the cases before firing them, in any firearm. You risk damage to the frame and chamber. By waxing the cartridges, the spent case is able to slam backwards into the frame face, and that's a lot of pressure - even in a relatively small caliber like the 223. Think of it as slamming the frame face with hammer every time you touch one off! The chamber should always be clean of any lubricants before firing the gun.

Try wiping each cartridge with a little cleaner or lacquer thinner to remove some of the coating. I know that sounds like a pain, but since you are shooting a single shot, it won't be so bad. If that doesn't work, you should stay away from the mil-surp ammo in your Contender, use it in a semi-auto or Mauser-type bolt gun instead.
 

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I will post a short reply to the above post with my opinions on the subjects that have been mentioned. I do this as an opinion only and hope to avoid any arguement.

5.56 ammo vs .223 ammo is about 10k PSI chamber pressure difference. If you are shooting Wolf 5.56 steel case ammo and have to lube it to get it out of the chamber, quit shooting it.

If you are shooting Wolf .223 steel case ammo and have to use very minor or trace amounts of imperial sizing lube on the neck only to get it out of your chamber, you are relieving some stress (steel on steel) and should not hurt yourself or your barrel.

Some brass cases are lubed prior to being fired on purpose. If you are not familiar with these purposes, I encourage you to use caution. Chamber pressures can dramatically increase as lube, even minute amounts, can manipulate case expansion. A similar, but somewhat less dramatic example, is the dent found in case shoulders when sizing bottle neck cases with too much lube.

I would shoot steel case ammo in a cheapy $100 gun or if nothing else was available.

I will not ever shoot steel case ammo in any of my guns as long as I have access to brass (or even aluminum..ewww..choke) cased ammunition.

This is just my opinion of the steel cases that too many shooters at my club (and lots of other places) leave littering the range.

Steve :)
 
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