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Discussion Starter #1
Author: JAMES HALPIN
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Staff
Date: October 26, 2007
Publication: Anchorage Daily News (AK)
Page: A1


Word count: 704
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A pack of wolves killed about a half-dozen sled dogs from three teams in Marshall on Wednesday night before residents of the Yukon River village chased them out of town, according to village officials and Alaska State Troopers. The wolves killed three adult dogs, including a female with pups, several villagers said. About three of the pups were also killed and several other dogs injured.

"They were running through the whole town here," said Dewayne Cooper.


Sorry I was unable to copy this on the day it was posted in the paper, so the rest of the article is not there. But these wolves had came into the village earlier in the day. The kids in the village fired shots to drive the wolves off, but they later returned.

We can thank Friends Of Animals and Defenders Of Wildlife for this. They are the ones that keep getting court injunctions to prevent us from effectively reducing wolf numbers. You don't just walk out into the woods and shoot wolves. They are extremely smart and cunning. The only effective way to kill them is with aircraft. And that can only be done right after a fresh snow, where you can track them and see them against a white background. Just think people in the lower 48, your day is coming. A few more years and they will be coming into your residential communities and killing your dogs and kids, dragging them off and eating them. Before someone says they don't attack people, better really check out your facts, two or three people get attacked every year up here in Alaska. A couple of years ago a man was skiing on the Tanana River. When he did not come home a search was made. All that was found was his skis, a big bloody spot, with little human remains, and lots of wolf tracks.
 

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Sourdough
We had a 5' long 90# gray that was taken in the winter of 2005 in Pike county which is around 60mile east of my location here in central IL. What he did was legal as IL did not recognize the wolf as being resident. The DNR, or perhaps the politics did not like this and talked of protection in the same newspaper article. This (protection) happened as last years regulations dedicated a whole page to Don't Shoot A Wolf "under penalty" to the booklet.
This page keyed on showing the differences (Ears & Tracks) between the Coyotes & Wolfs. ::)

The biologist had predicted that the Wolf would extend its range "north to south" across the lower 48 within five years. They are running a year or two behind on this prediction but we do get a few sightings here in IL. Sightings in Iowa & Missouri are much more common at this time. Wisconsin @ our north border probably provides the best chance of seeing one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When you start seeing them is when you have a problem. That means they are losing their fear of man. At that point it is only a matter of time, they are opportunist and will attack when they feel the time is right. And they will attack, they are the top predator in the wild. Especially when the deer numbers start to decline, and the farmers make it dangerous to go near their stock. Then it little old ladies attending their gardens, kids waiting at the bus stop, anyone walking home late at night, and any dog left outside especially ones on chains.

Thanks to Dave-in-the-bush here is a link. http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/wildlife/wolves/story/9408620p-9320303c.html
 

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This was an interesting article, especially considering that it was freaking the locals out.

My DeLorme software recons that (As The Crow Fly's--or Raven in this case)
Mount Village~St Marys=17.5 mile
St Marys~Pilot Station=12.5 mile
Pilot Station~Marshall=26.5 mile
Marshall~Russian Village=25.3 mile

It appears that those wolves can work these towns pretty hard all while having the security of the River passage for a hide out.
Sourdough...I think that it is time for you to get that little plane fueled up and go check things out.

And also, (I think this was you?) don't be going out on those early morning hunt's while exhaling on the predator call every time your left foot hit's the ground...You might get something bigger than a Fox this time.
;)
 

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You're awful late... Re: Wolves Attack

Hate to "burst your bubble," but the problem is already here. In California, the breaksfast food state --full of fruits, nuts and flakes, they outlawed the taking of mountain lions/pumas... right after that they were trying to get the same standards --NO killing-- applied to coyotes. The wives of the very rich who have those homes in the brush covered hills around the city noticed coyotes who had come out of the brush onto the manicured lawns to try to sneak up on children and screamed bloody murder... After all a child, to a coyote, is just a fat, dumb meal... That effort died suddenly... ;D And more recently there have been joggers and bicyclists attacked on "trails" by mountain lions... Awwww... Poor cats must not understand who its friends are... ::) So wolves, big "doggies" are just another... chapter in this stupidity. [Then there were the "catch and release" types "saving prairie dogs" in Colorado on Nat. T.v.] And, no doubt, some people will have to suffer to get reasonable measures taken to "control them."

I read an account from KS in an article on Ricin, the poison from castor beans... This was the late 1800s after the buffalo were gone. Government hunters took a horse and slaughtered it (another "sin" today) and cut the meat into 4 inch chunks. They poisoned 4 or 5 chunks of the whole horse and buried them in the pile of flesh/guts. Wolves came and ate everything, chewed the bones, EXCEPT those chunks that had been poisoned. Ricin was less, REPEAT less, easy to identify and got some of these super smart wolves. Repeat, SOME... Luck to us alllllllll.... :(
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Our forefathers knew what they were doing. They knew that the wolves and man cannot live together in close proximity. I would hate to see the wolf totally wiped out but there was a reason they removed them from the lower 48 states. The benefits were fantastic, look at the elk numbers, and the deer that was available for hunters. They also did not have to worry about the wife and kids when they went out to the garden, or to the barn. Then a group of people went and brought them back. These people are not the ones that are having to address the problems. The people that were responsible for bring them back live in cities far away.

It's the same here in Alaska. The only effective way to hunt wolves to where you can really make a difference is with the use of airplanes. Every time we want to have a hunt using airplanes. The group from Connecticut goes to the west coast court system. There they get a bleeding heart judge, that does not understand the circumstances, to issue a court injunction to stop the hunt. Being that the courts are in Washington and Oregon we don't know anything about it till the injunction is served on the state, we don't get the opportunity to make a rebuttal in court till it's too late. That is a major problem with being geographically separated from the rest of the states.
 

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Our focus here in the lower 48 (for right now) will be on the Northern Rockies as there was recent, tentative count of 1,545 Wolves. This was a 19% increase over the 2006 count. Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho appear to be leading the way with heavy saturation in some areas. I don’t know exactly when these Wolves were reintroduced but it has been at least ten years.

Even with these numbers, the so called environmental groups say that the animals could end up back on the list if their fate is left up to the State officials who favor hunting and other measures to reduce the numbers.
The State officials along with representatives of the livestock industry and some hunting groups say that by staying on the endangered list, Wolves would continue to take an unacceptable toll on live-stock and big game.

Sourdough,
I couldn’t find any information on attacks on people but feel that you and iiranger have hit the nail on the head when you claim that Once That Fear Is Gone…Watch Out!
Thanks for the heads up on your situation in Alaska, ours will be worth paying attention to.
 

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Being that the courts are in Washington and Oregon we don't know anything about it till the injunction is served on the state, we don't get the opportunity to make a rebuttal in court till it's too late. That is a major problem with being geographically separated from the rest of the states.
[/quote]

Dear 'dough...

"we don't get the opportunity to make rebuttal in court till it's too late..."

#1). This is very poor "management of the government" (the courts) by "the people..."
There is an organization, leadershipinstitute.org, [Mr. Blackwell, Leadership Institute, Arlington, VA] who teaches effective, REPEAT effective, GOVERNMENT INVOLVEMENT. I would suggest you/yours make his acquaintance. I doubt he will be coming to Alaska any time soon, but he has held classes in Seattle. Or you can send young people (or any age, FIGHTERS) to Arlington for the trainings. It is cheap. There are travel scholarships. Free bunks (little hard, but I like that). There are job opportunities for the youths... If you don't make his acquaintance, you are part of the problem...

#2). Frankly, when this sort of thing happens in a land of government "by the people" it is irresponsible and stupid. At very little cost you can have someone monitoring the west coast courts (from Alaska by computer) and have a response prepared for filing... Yes, you have to have a real "attorney" do the filing, but with knowledge and organzation .. [Mr. B also teaches fund raising...] and a little money that the rich are more than happy to part with to support their interests (cattle owners for a start, tourist operators,)... But someone has to do it. NRA does a decent job in Washington DC. Elsewhere... lame mostly. Sermon over. LUCK.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
glanceblam: For some reason I can't find any statistics on wolf attacks either, but we read about them in the local news paper here in Alaska. In May of 2005 my best friend and his wife were visiting us. I took them up to the Arctic Circle, there is a wayside there with out houses. The following day there was a lady attacked there in the parking lot by a female wolf. The woman was bitten several times on the buttocks, as she made her way into the out house to get away from the wolf. A couple driving into the parking lot a couple of hours later was able to run the wolf off. The couple and the woman that was attacked all agreed that it was a lactating female. The following day a bike rider was riding down the Dalton highway near the same area and was suddenly being chased by a wolf. A trucker passing swerved and hit the wolf with his front tire, killing it. This attack was a male, different wolf from the one that attacked the woman the day before. It's common news for us to hear about wolves attacking dogs kept outside up here. And every year we hear on the news about one or two attacks on humans up here. And just think about all the ones that does not get reported. A friend of mine has a mining claim out in the mountains. He claims it's not uncommon for him to walk outside in the morning and find a wolf slinking around camp. He generally shoots them and sells the skins. A few have actually came after him, before he shot them. No doubt tho that if he had kids around the camp there would be serious problems. Several years ago I had a Moose hide hanging in the back yard. That night I heard something out back. The wife said dogs are pulling you hide off the pole. So I went to the back door with a 12ga. I opened the door and yelled, here they came running straight at me. I shot and killed both. I never reported it, I just skinned them and sold the pelts. The neighbors all tease me about shooting delinquent sled dogs, but these were wolves.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The wife is fit to be tied, the Beagles won't go out into the yard in the mornings. They will step out on the porch, sniff the air, then go back inside. They won't go out till I get up and go out with them carrying a 12ga. I don't blame them one bit. I've been going out into the flood project near our house. During this time I've seen the track of two groups of wolves. One group has 2 large members and 4 smaller ones. The second pack has 3 large members and 3 smaller ones. I also saw a single lone Black Wolf across the plain. The distance was too far for a shot and I did not want to educate him about shooters so I did not try and chase him either. But it is still in the area. Got this in todays Fairbanks Daily News Miner, my back yard borders the folks on Nelson Rd.

Wolf drops dog when owner gives chase

By Tim Mowry
[email protected]
Published November 28, 2007

Scooter may have a hole in his head and a wounded ego, but at least he lived to bark about it.

The plump 13-year-old schipperke/dachshund mix survived a wolf attack early Tuesday morning when his owner chased down the wolf in his pickup truck.

“I thought he was going to be dead,” said Travis Capps, holding 20-pound Scooter in his arms Tuesday afternoon outside his home off Nelson Road in North Pole.

Instead, the wolf dropped the dog when Capps pulled up behind it as it trotted down the road with Scooter in its mouth. Scooter, except for a small puncture in his head and acting a little dazed, doesn’t appear any worse for wear.

“He’s just sort of in shock,” Capps said a few hours after Scooter’s scare. “He got whupped up pretty good.

“I think his pride is hurt more than anything else,” he said, scratching the roly-poly black dog’s ears.

Chances are good the wolf is part of a pack that killed and ate a dog in the same neighborhood a month ago and that state wildlife biologists suspect also killed a dog at 19.5 Mile Chena Hot Springs Road last week.

The latest attack was nearly a repeat of the first dog killing in North Pole on Oct. 31, when a homeowner in the same neighborhood let his two dogs out early in the morning and one of them was killed. The difference this time is there was one wolf instead of five.

“I let my dogs out to pee at four in the morning and then I heard all this barking,” said Capps, who lives just a street over from the first incident. “I thought they were fighting with each other, so I ran out there and yelled at them.”

His golden retriever, Shasta, came running up the driveway, but Scooter didn’t. Instead, he saw a “black streak” dart across the end of his driveway and then heard Scooter yelping as the wolf carried him down the road.

“I was in my underwear, so I came back into the house, threw some clothes on, jumped in my pickup and drove down the road thinking I could intercept him,” Capps said. “I thought he was dead.”

He didn’t go far down the road before he saw the wolf trotting along, carrying Scooter in its mouth.

“As soon as I got up on him with the pickup he dropped (Scooter),” said Capps, a 37-year-old equipment operator.

Capps picked up the dog, whose neck was covered with saliva, and drove home. Then he grabbed a gun and drove back down the road. The wolf was trotting back toward the house.

“He was coming back up the road,” Capps said. “As soon as he saw my pickup he ran back into the woods the way he came.”

The incident surprised Capps, even though he knew his neighbor’s dog was killed by wolves a month ago.

“I’ve lived here 35 years and never had anything like this happen before,” Capps said.

After last week’s attack at 19.5 Mile Chena Hot Springs Road, state wildlife biologist Tom Seaton with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Fairbanks said the wolves could potentially target more dogs now that they’ve identified them as food.

“I doubt they’ll go on a dog killing spree, but there’s no doubt they’re looking at them as a food source,” he said on Monday talking about the Chena Hot Springs Road attack.

Capps, meanwhile, plans to keep his eye out for wolves in the neighborhood.

“This wolf pack has got familiar with this subdivision and has got a taste for dogs,” he said, standing outside his home off Nelson Road. “For them to come in this far is pretty ballsy.

“I’m not into slaughtering wolves, but I’m a hunter and as far as I’m concerned wolf season opened on Nov. 1,” Capps said. “Maybe I can make Scooter a little fur coat.”

Contact staff writer Tim Mowry at 459-7587.
 

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"Wolf Garden", from an old trapping book written in Europe. This one was invented by Lap Landers.

Make a round picket fence out of tall poles. Add another picket fence just outside the first, make them just far enough apart for a wolf to go around between the two, without being able to turn around.

Have two gates. The one on the inside fence should be latchable, the one in the outside fence should be free swinging, but can be blocked from opening out.

Block both gates open. Toss something wolves will eat in the middle. Re bait as needed.

When ready to kill the wolves, latch the inner gate shut. Push the outer gate in so it blocks the circular path and rig something so the outer gate cannot be pushed open outwards. Toss something good to eat in the middle.

The refinements should be obvious. You should be able to take a whole pack with this. Shoot shovel and shutup.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No need to shoot, shovel, and shut up! I'll skin them and sell the hides. They will bring from $200.00 to $400.00 apiece. And it's legal here in Alaska.
 

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Sourdough
Yours would be an exciting hunt, scouting out those valleys with the .338/378 and the range finder in hand.
I know that you are also doing some locating and calling with the elect. While a canine distress would be an obvious choice, another that might work would be the gray fox pup's.
Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
They struck again, killed a dog over in two rivers. That's just across the river from here (river is frozen). Killed a Chessie/Lab mix, all that was left was a collar and piece of intestine. Conditions are poor for getting out now. We had warm weather for several days and the snow either melted or turned to ice. The area where they are running has no snow cover, so a snow machine is out. That area has a restriction on tired vehicles also so the 4-wheeler is out. What snow that did not melt turned to ice and makes for hard hiking. I've already fallen once and hurt my back so I'm not going out walking again till we get some snow cover. Do plan on taking the truck and driving the perimeter and calling from the truck.
 

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;) Sourdough :
I've been following your posts, and felt that these characteristics of the wolf you'all describe would extend down into the lower 48 states as well, but I have yet hear of anything of the sort. If it weren't for these posts, I would have never heard of their maraudings in Alaska either.

So, I went on the WEB to do a little search. Everything the government posted pointed to the good of these animals. I only found one instance of destruction by wolves, and that was from less than 100 Mexican (Lobo) wolves introduced to Arizona, which had 20 confirmed kills on one Rancher's cattle. He had to sue the government to make them pay him $16,000 for loss of livestock.

If the Mexican Packs, which run in number of (5) to a pack will do this, would a pack of northern grays (30) pass up a herd of delicious veal to go rabbit hunting?, I don't think so.

Thanks for keeping us informed.
 

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I've heard gossip about wolves hanging out near Juneau and Ketchikan, eating dogs and cats. It's just not considered news so people don't talk about it much. No "Golly, gee whiz" factor.

Though people do laugh about toy dogs getting picked up by the eagles, sometimes right next to the owners.
 
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