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cooking a wood chuck

WOW! There sure are a lot of funnies that come to mind about this but suffice it to say woodchucks are tough. About the only way really is to either par boil or pressure cook the critter. Separate into pieces removing any vestiges of fat, then cook as above until you can separate meat from bones, discard broth and bones.

Use meat and prepare a soup or stew using any receipe you like. If you have a pressure cooker, cube 2 large potatoes, 1 large white onion, 2 carrots, 2 celery stalks. Add 1 can diced tomatoes, 1 16 oz can beef broth + 1 can water, 1 bay leaf, salt & pepper to taste. Pressure about 12 mins or until potatoes are done. Enjoy!

P.S. How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
 

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'Chucks have a couple of castor glands located on the inner side of the forearms, that if not removed will make you think you're cookin skunk.
Young ones taste better than old ones, an they are best tasting if shot in the fall. Soak them in cold,salted water for a few hours first and make sure you get ALL the fat off by trimmin and parboiling. Around here, woodchuck livers are considered THE gourmet treat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you!

Thanks Joel. You say the glands are on the inside front legs? How do you prepare the livers?
Thanks again,
Bim
 

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Yeah, they're visible after you skin it out. Look like little "kernels". Livers are done just like chicken livers. Most folks just roll them in flour and fry them in butter or whatever. Don't forget to soak them in a little salt water first. As far as other recipes for chuck go, any squirrel or rabbit one works, just cook longer. I did mine in a pressure cooker, but then I do most four legged game that way, except venison tenderloin and steaks.
 

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woochuck cookin'

This really takes me back aways. I had an uncle who erally loved woodchuck. He paid us to kill and clean them for him each spring. He wanted the young ones and as soon as they emerged from the den. If allowed to graze too long they started getting strong. When first coming out off the den they are 'milk fat'. In essence they are the wood chuck equivilent of veal.. Just clean as you would a squirrel(yes squirrels have the underarm kernel glands also), role in seasoned flour and fry.... Don't fry it to death, just medium, no red left. Should be crisp on the outside and tender on the inside...now you've made me hungry..good luck from the gunnut69

PS-in Missouri the season on 'chucks doen't open until Memorial Day Weekend. Some of the young have been eating grass for too long by the time the season roles around.
 
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