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I'm getting ready to order my first wooden shafts to make my own arrows . I see parellel and tapered shafting, which should I start with ? I also wanted to try and keep the cost down on crown dipping paint and clear coating . Is there anyone that buys their stuff from the hardware store that could tell me what they use ...The stuff at 3rivers just seems way over price plus s+h ..... thanks for any help
 

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shafts

I personally do all my shopping with Kustom King. GREAT FOLKS!!!!!
The use parallel shafts as I do not see the need for tapered. I stain 3/4 of the shaft, leaving the feather end bare. I then poly coat the whole shaft and add a basic cresting between the stained and bare section. The base of the cresting is black with 2 white stripes. The position of the white stripes are in front of the riser and represent the proper brace height. That way with an arrow nocked, I look at the front of the riser to see if my brace height is correct. That really comes in handy if I have to replace a string in the field and don't have my bow square handy.

My total cost not including shafts or feathers is about $15 and my arrows meet my needs and are pleasing to look at. My brother on the other hand spent about $200 on paint, cresting tool, cap and shaft dipping tubes, hair driers and flux modulators.......and his arrows meet his needs and are pleasing fo look at. But he said he'll NEVER spend that kind of money again.


Just my opinion, but I hate spending $ on something when cheaper will do.
 

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shot both side by side and my experience is that ...

tapered just seems to be more accurate for me. just my experience.
 

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Wood arrows

:toast: Check out stickbow.com then go to the arrow section on the lefthand side it will tell you just about everything you need to know about arrow making. I went to hardware store and got a light gray stain,very cheap for a quart. Could probally do a thousand arrows with the quart. Then bought a pint of white lacquer from 3 rivers for the part of the arrow that the fletching and cresting go.
 

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I shoot a recurve and use parallel shafts. I use water based stain from the harware store and finish with water based poly brushed on with a disposable foam brush. I do not dip them but I put a crest on them using testors hobby paint (thinned) from the hobby shop. I do this after 4 or 5 coats of the poly.I hope that helps.
Dennis
 

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Parallel shafts can and do make many good arrows suitable for any task as long as the archer does his/her part.

"Normally" taperred shafts are slightly more forgiving should the archer not have the best release or bow hand (torque the bow upon release) by offering SLIGHTLY more clearance by having a reduced diameter at the nock as it passes the shelf.

Barrelled tapered shafts just don't make sense to me. I wouldn't want to reduce my point strength by having a reduced tip, nor do I like the clearance aspect around the bow as the middle of the shaft is thicker than the point and would get pushed against the riser/sightwindow AND the rest both upon release putting IMO the arrow into an exaggerated paradox even if this effect quickly disappears in flight by the lighter tips/heavy middle...the problem being is the shaft still going to be pointed the right direction. Generally yes, but again when things are not ideal I find this to be an inferior design to traditional or normally nock end only taperred shafts.

What do I use? Nock end taper. I really believe in having a well tuned bow...and although I may not be the best shot or as good as I should be...I have studied arrow flight extensively and I have worked on developing an excellent bow hand and get SUPERB arrow flight EVEN WITH AN UNFLETCHED ARROW being able to have it fly 20 yards and remain true (in line) to the target without any side or up or down kick at the nock. Form (especially in the bowhand) is essential to accuracy. Arrow flight is the next step leading to the beginning of accuracy.
 
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