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Tried to cast some 170 grain, 30 cal bullets with a new Lee mould yesterday. I'd prevously cleaned the mould with a degreaser and thoroughly removed the degreaser and dried the mould. Before casting, I smoked the mould with a match. Fluxed the melt often and well. Cast with hot (blue color on top) and with cooler temp melt. Each bullet came out with a wrinkle. At the same time, I was throwing 255 and 405 grainers, pretty enough to send a picture to Lee to put in their catalog. Went through four pots of lead, mould was up to temp. What was I doing wrong? :shock:
 

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I've had problems with Lee molds when they are new. I degreased them well but had the wrinkles. I gave them a light spray with Midway Drop Out Mold Release and the wrinkles went away. Several others in these forums also said the same thing. Usually down the road when the mold release wears away you don't have to keep spraying.
My guess, and it's only a guess, is that the spray coats the microscopic oil that is left in the pours of the mold and allows good bullet casting. After a period of time this oil is burned out.
CR
 

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aluminum is a very poris metal and most of the time despite what people say you have to stick part of the mould in the lead and cook this out for a couple of min. let cool and they should be good after that!:wink:
 

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my last new lee mould humbled me for several casting sessions. i washed it , coated with drop out spray and after the third session , it healed itself and started casting good.
 

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Often when you're getting wrinkled bullets it's because something is too cold - the lead is solidifying too quickly.

Rule of thumb - 700dF to 750dF pot temperature for steel moulds, 800 for aluminum moulds.

Aluminum moulds cool quickly.

Preheat all moulds.

Mould temperature of about 400dF works well.

Rate of casting will affect mould temperature.

Cooling the sprue cutter helps. Touch it to a damp spounge. That way you can fill a hotter mould sooner.
 

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Yup

I cook my Lee molds right in the lead to heat them up before I start casting and have never had a problem.
I just stick a corner in the lead for a few minites and away we go! :)
 

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Since you have cleaned the mould allready that is not an issue. Pre heat the mould and run the melt temp at 800 to 850 all should be good.
 

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I clean new Lee moulds by boiling them in soapy water for a half hour or more. Just rinse them off in tap water and make sure they are perfectly dry before you try to use them.
 
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