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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hot dang Pards! I finally got around to doing the action job on my "new" .45 Rossi. And I'm VERY pleased!

When I got it I was happy with it's accuracy with my BP loads but it was a good bit rougher than my older .357 Rossi. Of course I had put an action job in it a long time ago and so I was spoiled. Actually I thought this one was pretty good, it just wasn't up to my standards of slick. It opened and closed pretty nice, but there was small hitch in the action just before closing.

Of course I suspected the typical overly strong ejector spring, the usual culprit with tight closing/opening 92s. So I opened her up with intentions of just dealing with the spring. When I took the stock off I noted what looked like an aftermarket main spring, but when completely disassembled I found what appears to be a stock ejector spring. And I noted what appeared to be the marks of a careful stoning job on the rails, polishing of the trigger engagement surfaces, and the bolt. So I clipped off three coils from the ejector spring and reassembled......not good! (maybe I expect way too much :shock: ) So I tore it all apart again, but first I worked the action a few times and watched engagement surfaces closely. I decided to go the whole route using Bull Schmitts instructions from CAS-L. I can do this from memory, but don't ask me to give them here. Once the site is back up I'll post a link sometime. When I removed the main spring I found that although it appears to be an aftermarket job, it was still way stouter than I needed. So I clipped it too! Then I looked a bit closer at the bolt and noted that although it has been given a stone job, the curved surfaces that begin the engagement of the locking bolts had not been touched. So I carefully but thoroughly polished these curved surfaces, being very careful not touch the flat "load bearing" surfaces that these curve up into and that bear against the locking bolts. After I did this I took a look at the trigger plate.......Ah HA!! A culprit has been found! It looked like this area was actually coming into contact with the locking bolts. So I polished this area and refitted it into the action. Sure enough there was a problem, the fit of the parts wasn't perfect and the trigger plate could slide in too far if not carefully reassembled, causing a major drag spot...I must remember this about this particular gun!

I next removed the lifter and popped out the little spring on the side tension doohicky and clipped two coils from it and reinstalled it. Then did the same with retaining latch on the lever.

Ok, it's time...put it all back together, remembering that trigger plate problem. When I got everything back in there and put the trigger plate on I found that I had to push it in tight to get the screw through it and the hammer, but after the screw was in I could use a small dowel and mallet to pop that sucker back just a tiny schooch. then it's time to test my work.

I grabbed a handfull of empty cases and primed them, loaded them into the mag tube and OMG!! THIS THING IS FANTASTIC!!!!!!!!!! Slicker 'n goose grease, pops primers every time, and still good enuff to cycle EMPTIES through the mag tube and chamber them! :-D :-D :-D
I'm happier than a pig in a mud hole! That's all pards! :D
 

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Sounds like I need to start sending you my guns!! Congratulations on a job that makes you happy! Only thing better'n a sweet shootin' slick handleing gun is another one to go with it!
 

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Anybody have links or know of a video for doing Model Ps/clones or 66/73s? I always hear "stone this and that". If I knew enough to know how to properly stone things I wouldn't be asking. I know not to touch the sear but how do you know what else not to stone?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rule of thumb that has served me well down through the years, if it looks remotely like it will be resisting the recoil forces from the breech face I leave it be! I'm not familier with the 66/73 type actions and won't presume to tell you that I can keep you out of trouble with this advise, but it has always worked for me on other firearms.
 

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Is it true that the rifle will smooth itself out after a few thousand rounds? Know this doesn't help with the springs but the metal parts will wear in.
 

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Guns, fine wine and good women all get better with age.


(hope my better half sees this, maybe it'll get me brownie points)
 

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My philosophy is if two parts move and rub against each other they need to be stoned or honed. Now I'm talking ONLY with the use of a fine Arkansas stone, crocus cloth or very fine abrasive paste. Do not remove metal, just polish.

GB
 
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