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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:D Cheers dude,
Just did some "trial runs" with the #55 powder measure - and I'm not sure about my results.
I did 40 case loads at a setting of "60" on the steel, and they ranged anywhere from 59.5 to 60.9 when I weighed them. Is that spread normal, or do I have a problem with the way I'm "working" the measure?
I tried to do every cycle the same - but I couldn't gaurantee that I didn't screw something up between cycles.
Also, FYI - every time you're going to be not using you mould for a while - I'd spray it with LPS-3 or the equivilant. I just tried casting and the bullets kept being "wrinkled" after about 30 pourings - then I looked at the inside of my mould - guess what was waiting for me? A very light coating of RUST!
HI may be "paradise" - but it H*** on the reloading equipment!

cr
 

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CR

Yeah, we got some of that rust problem here, too. Anywhere withing a short drive of the ocean, and anywhere where the humidity stays over 80% for a good part of the year!

Your variation sounds a but large, what powder were you using? The larger the grain the more the expected variation, but that sounds way to high. I may not be the best one to ask, I haven't had mine a year yet, and only load a couple times a year, unfortunately. Got a family, a house, honey-do jobs (5 unit bookshelf the current one), and the range an hour away on the freeway. It all conspires to make shooting time somewhat rare.

As to your molds, spray them with WD-40 or another light oil. The first bullet or two will burn it all off, and those get remelted anyway. Use the Rapine mold prep, or make your own with a suspension of graphite in alcohol. Some of the older casters suggest that a mold has to be "rusted in", that your light coating of rust is somehow good. I'm not sure I ever followed or understood that one.
 

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pop corn tins!!!!! They had a sale after christmass on popcorn in thouse big tins about a foot high or over and 10/12 inch wide. Throw the pocrn out or feed them boat lanch pigions (sea gulls) withit.Use the tin with midway vapor chips throen in the bottem.stack your molds in even with handles. put the lid on and it will keep for years. I also put 1or2 chips in die box.s and keeps the dies rust free. Have you heard of echo dies, now that old dies. Still like new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
#55 Powder measure

:D Cheers,
I using up the last two jugs of Pyrodex RS - it's a double "f" equivilant.
Maybe after these two, I'll try Marsh's "Holy Black". Or maybe not.
FYI: I'm starting to have some of my REALLY old brass (25+ years) start failing. What I'm getting are legnthwise "cracks" about an inch from the brase. I usually find them when I hand wash the brass after shooting.
Don't know what's causing it, but like I said - this brass is OLD.
It just dawned one me - I've had this gun and brass longer than "this" wife - but don't tell her!

cr :twisted:
 

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Crash

I don't know the metallurgy, but your brass is hardening and the metal is changing if you are getting lengthwise cracks rather than cracks around the case. Have you anneled these cases recently? It may be that they are simply too old, but the lengthwise cracks suggest hardening problems.

I don't know this, but rumor has it that Pyrodex does strange things to brass as well. Your comment suggests that you have used it exclusively? Maybe someone else can comment on the effect of Pydroex residue on brass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Pyrodex

:shock: Cheers,
Yea, I've used Pyrodex exclusivly since I've had the gun.

Never heard of it affecting brass, but I'll rattle my old mans phone and ask HIM - he is one of the "metalurgists".

It's only the oldest brass that is splitting - but I check all the brass when I wash them - so if some newer one start to go bad, I'll let you know ASAP.

cr
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
brass

:shock: Cheers,

You know how "dumb" you feel when something is pointed out to you that you've completely overlooked? Well fellows, I'm baskiing in that feeling right now!!!

Just got off the phone with "Grumpy" (my father). First mistake - I woke him up (at 82, sleep is VERY important). Second, I didn't have my "verbage" correct. Third, I couldn't tell him the specific alloy of brass.
Fourth, when I described how I was annealing and where the "cracks" were showing up, he asked if the "one inch of water"(annealing) didn't ring a bell because the "cracks" are either around the circumference about an inch from the base or they run "up" the brass length-wise starting at - you guessed it - one inch!

Oh yea - the "correct term" for this is "stress-corrosion cracking" - see, I got ONE word right.

Anyway, from here I'm off the see if RCBS can give me any info on the alloy and maybe some data on others who might have had this problem.

He also asked WHY we annealed this way - he'd use the kitchen stove and anneal the whole length. Only problem with that is you have to know the ALLOY before you can figure out what temperature and duration you'll have to use.

What ever made me think it would ever change?

(I shouldn't have woke him up to start with - he'll be better after his "nap".

cr :D
 

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The Shrink said:
CR

...As to your molds, spray them with WD-40 or another light oil. The first bullet or two will burn it all off, and those get remelted anyway. Use the Rapine mold prep, or make your own with a suspension of graphite in alcohol. Some of the older casters suggest that a mold has to be "rusted in", that your light coating of rust is somehow good. I'm not sure I ever followed or understood that one.
I don't know, either, but I found the same recommendation in Lyman's Cast Bullet Handbook. They even go so far as to mention that blueing the cavity helps with release of the bullet, and, at least with most formulations, the blue is an oxide (rust). It always seemed kinda strange to me, too. Of course, if you use something like Brownell's Oxpho-Blue, it's not an oxide...it's some selenium compound. Wonder what that would do? The very light "texturing" of the cavity may help to release the bullet; maybe it defeats the tendency of two very closely-matching surfaces to stick together, like Jo-blocks. Lets air into the joint, kinda-sorta.
 
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