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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had the opportunity to visit a guy who happens to be an NRA firearms instructor. We had a good conversation and even did some dry firing out his window at some small targets that he had placed at different ranges. This was a bit unnerving because he was off to the side watching the end of the barrel like a hawk while I was doing the dryfiring.

Fortunately, I passed his inspection on an unwavering muzzle with no pushing/pulling on the handgun when the trigger broke. He did however, try to get me to change my shooting stance.
I was used to standing with my feet roughly at shoulders width and slightly arching my back so the weight of my upper muscle group would rest on my spine...What he had me do was what one so often see's in the mag pictures, Shoulder width feet but with the gun hand foot about a step forward, arms out & locked, torso leaning forward...He demonstrated this to be the stronger shooting platform by lightly shoving me, first in my position, and then in his.

I have been trying to practice this but just don't know. His stance does seem to be more solid, but to me, seems to cause more tremors in the sight picture as my muscles are not so relaxed.

What is your own offhand shooting position?

For those of you who regularly attend shoots or go to the public range, what styles do you see most often amoung those who do well? (my own range is private)

Thanks for any replies or insight on this. The goal as you know is to keep shrinking those groups!
 

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Depends on what I'm doing. For bullseye shooting it's regulation one-hand. For field shooting at game it's a Weaver stance supported by a rest. For plinking clay pigeons at 100 yards it's a Weaver stance without the benefit of a rest.
 

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Its not rocket science. Just use a stance that you are comfortable with. You will be more likely to repeat the stance from time to time. Any stance can be programmed into your brain if you repeat it enough but the question is are YOU willing to practice that much?
As long as you keep your sights aligned and operate the trigger correctly you will hit. If not no stance in the world will make up for it.
Do what is easy for you to repeat each time you shoot.
 

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Yup I agree do what is comfortable and natural for YOU and don't worry about what someone else does or thinks you should do. I've seen excellent shooters using about any and all possible stances over the years I competed.

What I do is face the target square on with feet a comfortable distance apart and hold both arms out in what I think is called an Isosoles triangle. I hold the handgun in my right hand and wrap my left under and around my right hand. This is what is comfortable and natural for me. During my competition days I won plenty of trophies enough to prove that for me it works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am glad to see some replies. For a while there I thought that I may have crossed a line when I said that this was an NRA Instructor. :eek: ;D ;D

MePlat
You hit the nail on the head concerning how much practice that one is willing to put in to it. I am getting to that age where the saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks has some meaning to it. I do shoot well enough that being challenged to the (dollar per shot) by the arrogant coworker or buddy doesn't bother me a bit as my responce is to suggest rimfire, cap n ball, single sot blackpowder, or centerfire. My enthusiasm for this usually calms them down some as they dont't usually own any old hog legs and are leery of my experience. I still like shooting enough to make this post which may improve my technique depending on the likes & dislikes.

Questor
I do not know what the regulation off hand shooting position is but I do fire a few hundred shots every year one handed. Mine is pretty much like the classic dueling stance with the body being almost perpendicular to the target with the four fingers of the off hand tucked away in the pants pocket. this is a very relaxing way to get off a cool, deliberate, shot. I was never one to attend organized shoots as the swing shift would always keep me away. I did enjoy a few good years on the local blackpowder circuit untill the club lost the lease.

Graybeard
I know what you are saying on the Iso triangle & the two hand hold which happens to be my primary stance. I like to arch my back just a bit as said to let my spine support the weight of my upper muscle group. I think that I learned this as a kid shooting a BB gun!
I don't think that I will change a thing for right now...maybe a scope one day but I am fine for now.
THANKS
 

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I arch my back a little bit, but also make sure that my shoulders are taking up the weight of my arms and the gun more than my back. If I let my back do too much work, it will make my upper body waver a little bit.

I can't stand that shoulders forward straight armed crap you see them do on the magazines, way too uncomfortable for me.
 

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I use the stance your instructor friend recommends when I am shooting action pistol and also practicing defensive shooting. But when shooting at a game animal, I do more like you do to get the gun a little more steady.

Like it was said above everybody is different and you have to keep an open mind but also know what works best for your situation.
 

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I have a tendency to arch back a little also. But I find that with each shot I take, especially with big kickers, I end up farther and farther back. By the time I empty the gun I'm about to fall over. I have to force myself to Lean into the gun but my shooting is better when I do.
 

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MePlat said:
Its not rocket science. Just use a stance that you are comfortable with. You will be more likely to repeat the stance from time to time. Any stance can be programmed into your brain if you repeat it enough but the question is are YOU willing to practice that much?
As long as you keep your sights aligned and operate the trigger correctly you will hit. If not no stance in the world will make up for it.
Do what is easy for you to repeat each time you shoot.
Ditto this weaver all the way in the field. IPSC has become a habit. I seldom shoot one handed anymore? Too old, I guess.
 

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It often depends on what I am shooting. If it is a 1911, I'll do a modified Weaver. Non-shooting side leg forward and a push pull with my hands and my body leaning into the shot. I do not tuck my non-dominate elbow low enough to please the true Weaver enthusiasts however. When hunting, I will often revert to my youth and shoot a single action revolver from an isosceles. When hunting, I always try to use some type of rest if possible, even if it is just leaning my forearm against a tree. That steadies things a lot for any longer shots. 44 Man
 

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When shooting offhand hunting....I try not to, but sometimes one does what one has to do..I have a rather peculiar looking stance...feet shoulder width apart, right arm extended and locked, left or off hand elbow bent resting on my upper belly with my left hand cupped under and holding on to the base of my right hand....works for me. It really takes the shakes from the scopes, I might add this is for my Encore and Contender handguns....With revolvers its pretty much as everyone else....Good shooting Mike
 
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