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Discussion Starter · #62 · (Edited)
After doing more reading and looking over the findings above, there’s nothing I’ve found that’s solid enough to conclude that no. 10 was definitely in one Confederate battery or another. However if I had to guess based on all of the circumstantial evidence I’ve collected, I’d guess it was one of the two (later three) 10-pounders in Reilly’s Battery, aka Rowan Artillery, originally formed in North Carolina. This is one of two units that we know for sure was armed with 10-pdr Parrott Rifles captured at Bull Run. The other was the 1st Rockbridge Artillery. Then there are three other units I listed in post no. 60 which are possibles but to me less likely because I haven’t found anything definite stating they received artillery captured at Bull Run.

A few posts back you’ll find a 4-page inventory of Reilly’s Battery done in the field: 1861 Parrott Rifle 2.9 inch registry number 10

No. 10‘s bore is “shot-out,” no rifling left. The vent either has an odd repair or has been replaced. These two features indicate the weapon was fired extensively, and probably continued in service well beyond when it should have been retired. The tube has drag marks on top, showing it was dragged upside-down over rocky soil. I havent yet found a good explanation for this. Take a look at the history of the Rowan Artillery here, there are details of where the guns fired, when, and how many rounds. One thing is clear in this history, the guns fired rapidly and depleted one ammunition chest after another. In one battle they got so hot a round “cooked off” and fired before the primer could be inserted.

To expand a bit on the extensive firing, Reilly’s battery reported firing 5174 rounds in the actions mentioned on pages 564-578, covering a 7-month period ending before Gettysburg. I’m guessing it fired over 2000 rounds at Gettysburg. So it is easy to see how the battery would have guns with worn bores and vents.

The chapter on Company “D” begins here:


Link to the book:


Back to the beginning for a moment, I’ve now had more time to gather data and think about which of the two US batteries at Bull Run actually lost No. 10 to the Confederates on July 21, 1861. My answer is again based on circumstantial evidence, but after I write it out, hopefully soon, it may convince you the gun had been part of Griffin’s Battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
After doing more reading and looking over the findings above, there’s nothing I’ve found that’s solid enough to conclude that no. 10 was definitely in one Confederate battery or another. However if I had to guess based on all of the circumstantial evidence I’ve collected, I’d guess it was one of the two (later three) 10-pounders in Reilly’s Battery, aka Rowan Artillery, originally formed in North Carolina. This is one of two units that we know for sure was armed with 10-pdr Parrott Rifles captured at Bull Run. The other was the 1st Rockbridge Artillery. Then there are three other units I listed in post no. 60 which are possibles but to me less likely because I haven’t found anything definite stating they received artillery captured at Bull Run.

A few posts back you’ll find a 4-page inventory of Reilly’s Battery done in the field: 1861 Parrott Rifle 2.9 inch registry number 10

No. 10‘s bore is “shot-out,” no rifling left. The vent either has an odd repair or has been replaced. These two features indicate the weapon was fired extensively, and probably continued in service well beyond when it should have been retired. The tube has drag marks on top, showing it was dragged upside-down over rocky soil. I havent yet found a good explanation for this. Take a look at the history of the Rowan Artillery here, there are details of where the guns fired, when, and how many rounds. One thing is clear in this history, the guns fired rapidly and depleted one ammunition chest after another. In one battle they got so hot a round “cooked off” and fired before the primer could be inserted.

To expand a bit on the extensive firing, Reilly’s battery reported firing 5174 rounds in the actions mentioned on pages 564-578, covering a 7-month period ending before Gettysburg. I’m guessing it fired over 2000 rounds at Gettysburg. So it is easy to see how the battery would have guns with worn bores and vents.

The chapter on Company “D” begins here:


Link to the book:


Back to the beginning for a moment, I’ve now had more time to gather data and think about which of the two US batteries at Bull Run actually lost No. 10 to the Confederates on July 21, 1861. My answer is again based on circumstantial evidence, but after I write it out, hopefully soon, it may convince you the gun had been part of Griffin’s Battery.
 
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